Obama Win Forces Republicans and Americans to Get Creative About How to Move America Forward

Today, I have no idea what Republicans are crying about. 

If you've ever dealt with a 4-year-old you may be spotting a similar behavior pattern. Say you give a toddler a cup of juice. They don't really want it — much less care about it — but the moment you take that cup away and put it in the fridge there they are squalling for it. 

Replace "cup of juice" with "Mitt Romney" and "4-year-old" with "the average Republican" and you have conservatives' reaction to last night's results. 


The point I'm trying to make here is, why are we suddenly so disappointed? 

Nearly a year ago, when the Republican candidates begin to announce their bid for nomination Romney was an ill-fit for many Republicans. Some found him too moderate, others found him not forward-thinking enough. And it shows. 

The Tea Party votes certainly didn't come to the polls in armies — the older, white vote was down a bit from 2008. Young voters and women voters went handily to President Obama. Clearly, Mitt Romney wasn't the candidate conservatives in America wanted. 

Alex Castellanos, top media adviser to Romney's 2008 bid and Bush's 2004, stated last night on CNN, "A loss will be a repudiation of the Republican party." Castellanos nailed it on the head.

But what is the next course of action? Republicans appear staunchly unified in the belief that Obama is wrong and taking the nation in the wrong direction. Yet when voters are asked, they can't seem to come up with anything else.

One post on Facebook asking conservatives for their input on how to move forward garnered over 500 comments. Nearly all of them offered no solutions and could only could point to Obama's mistakes or repeat campaign tropes. Is America really a nation so bereft of ideas? I doubt it. So in that spirit, I encourage all who read this — Democrat, Republican, or somewhere in-between — to post a comment. What are your ideas? ("Obama is wrong" does not suffice.)What should be our next course of action as a country?

The Bargain: In return, my next article will discuss your ideas, and what a new conservative future should look like. 

Those who worked their tail-feathers off this election, I salute you. As for the rest, dry your crocodile tears and get to brainstorming!

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Abigail Walls

I like big words. As communications specialist with a BA in political science and Philosophy, I aim to animadvert current issues...with a little bit of sass.

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