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At a Politico summit Tuesday, the FDA set off a fresh debate as to whether nondairy milks can be called “milk.” Milk is regulated by several standards that define nutritional value and other product requirements. And coconut, almond and soy milk are nondairy products and therefore don’t meet one particular standard: lacteal secretion by way of “one or more healthy cows.”

In other news, we visited the pizza farms of Minnesota and Wisconsin, delved into sunscreens made for people of color and look at five South Korean cities, beyond the capital, worth exploring.

Regulation on nondairy milk may be getting stricter

Almond, soy and coconut milks are displayed in a grocery store aisle.
Almond, soy and coconut milks are displayed in a grocery store aisle. AsiaTravel/Shutterstock

“An almond doesn’t lactate,” Food and Drug Administration commissioner Scott Gottlieb said Tuesday at the Politico Pro Summit. If the FDA enforces current standards, you might have to look for your almond, soy and coconut milk under a different name. Read more here.

How pizza farms are using food to educate visitors

Pizza night at Suncrest Garden Farms in Cochrane, Wisconsin.
Pizza night at Suncrest Garden Farms in Cochrane, Wisconsin. Stephanie Wu/Mic

With Wisconsin cheese, house-made dough and farm-fresh seasonal toppings, the pizza at these farms is teaching visitors about sustainable technology and entrepreneurship. Read more here.

People of color are less likely to use sunscreen — and these skincare brands are looking to fix that

A woman applying sunscreen.
A woman applying sunscreen. Daniel_Dash/Shutterstock

People of color are seven times less likely to use sunscreen. The problem often lies in the limited options, but new brands are trying to increase awareness of sun protection, designing products specifically for those with darker skin tones. Read more here.

South Korea beyond Seoul: bamboo forests, 5 must-visit places for green tea and more

A woman walks through a scene of umbrella lanterns made by elementary and middle school students at the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Lantern Festival in Jinju, South Korea.
A woman walks through a scene of umbrella lanterns made by elementary and middle school students at the Jinju Namgang Yudeung Lantern Festival in Jinju, South Korea. Kelly Kasulis/Mic

Millions of tourists have flocked to South Korea in recent years, and Seoul is no doubt the country’s biggest attraction. But beyond the capital, about half of South Korea’s population lives in smaller cities and countryside regions that are just as vibrant and worth a visit. Read more here.