Movement Must-Reads: Kaepernick, Kavanaugh and justice for Jordan Edwards
Colin Kaepernick kneels during the national anthem in September 2016. Ted S. Warren/AP

Colin Kaepernick’s new partnership with Nike was the big news on Labor Day weekend, with Brett Kavanaugh’s ongoing Supreme Court confirmation hearings coming hot on its heels.

See also what the president of the NAACP has to say about Kavanaugh’s potential impact on civil rights legislation. Read on for more.

From Mic:

Chauncey Alcorn on the prospect of widespread police accountability after former Balch Springs, Texas, police Officer Roy Oliver was sentenced to 15 years in prison for shooting and killing Jordan Edwards, an unarmed black teenager.

Chauncey also has a piece up on what considerations spurred Nike’s newly announced partnership with Colin Kaepernick — an event I wrote about when the news broke Monday here.

And thirdly, his op-ed about how history will view Kaepernick’s protest movement, in advance of the Thursday night kickoff of the 2018-2019 NFL regular season.

Natelegé Whaley interviewed NAACP president Derrick Johnson about the consequences Brett Kavanaugh’s likely appointment to the Supreme Court will have on civil rights progress.

And Xavier Harding with a helpful timeline of what’s happened in the Jason Van Dyke case over the past two years, just in time for jury selection in the former Chicago police officer’s trial for killing Laquan McDonald.

From elsewhere:

“The Second Redemption Court” from the Atlantic, about how the current Supreme Court’s conservative elements are pursuing an agenda eerily similar to that which gave rise to Jim Crow after the Civil War.

This Des Moines Register column from Rob Tibbetts, father of slain college student Mollie Tibbetts, lambasting pundits and politicians for using his daughter’s death to further a racist immigration agenda.

And an exhaustive report from the Boston Globe on how Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s (D-Mass.) claims to Native American ancestry were never a factor in her hiring as a Harvard Law School professor — a claim conservatives have long used to discredit her.

Question of the week:

What do you think will be the enduring legacy of the Roberts Supreme Court court, with newly appointed Justice Neil Gorsuch and the likely addition of Brett Kavanaugh?

Send your thoughts to zak@mic.com for a chance to have your answer featured in next week’s newsletter!

That’s all for now. Until next week.

Zak Cheney-Rice, editor and writer, The Movement

The Movement by Mic
Writers and editors, The Movement