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A report of over 2,000 venues in New York City found that the sound levels at restaurants and bars range between 78 and 81 decibels on average, roughly the equivalent of a passing freight train. And exposure to all that sound for hours on end could mean actual hearing loss. Luckily, there’s an app to help us sort through all the noise — and find our quiet place.

In other news, Mic explored how using cloth napkins and eco-friendly toiletries could help you on your quest to a zero-waste trip, examined the supposed skin and joint benefits of collagen-based vitamins and took a look why kid meals in California will never be the same.

This app will tell you where the quietest — and noisiest — bars are

Fans cheer at a bar during a soccer game.
Fans cheer at a bar during a soccer game. Mario Tama/Getty Images

Because sometimes you just want to have a quiet conversation over drinks.

The world’s first zero-waste trip — a wildlife safari in Yellowstone National Park — is here

A tent from Collective Retreats on a Natural Habitat Adventures Yellowstone trip
A tent from Collective Retreats on a Natural Habitat Adventures Yellowstone trip Collective Retreats/Natural Habitat Adventures

Guests will refuse, recycle, reuse, upcycle and compost over 99% of their waste on this trip to Yellowstone National Park in 2019.

Should you use collagen-based supplements, face masks or shampoo? Experts weigh in.

Will collagen-based supplements improve your skin, joints or nails?
Will collagen-based supplements improve your skin, joints or nails? Volodymyr Tverdokhlib/Shutterstock

Celebs are touting the benefits of the buzzy wellness trend, but skin experts aren’t so sure.

Soda can no longer be the default drink on kids’ menus in California

According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, KFC is one of the fast-food restaurants that still has sugary drinks on its kids’ menu.
According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, KFC is one of the fast-food restaurants that still has sugary drinks on its kids’ menu. Gene J. Puskar/AP

In the United States, nearly 1 in every 5 kids ages 6 to 19 has obesity — but a new bill in California may change that.