Gay Marriage in Supreme Court: Cases May be Heard

On Election Day about a month ago, it seemed that gay marriage recognition was nearly a national inevitability.  Three states passed legislation to allow same sex marriage and a ban was voted down in a forth. The current roster of states that recognize same sex marriage is: Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Vermont, and Washington. This brings the total number to nine states plus The District of Columbia. However, none of these state-level marriages are federally recognized, and could be overruled at any point.

On Friday, the Supreme Court met for a regular conference.  On the agenda was whether or not a test case for same sex marriage rights would be heard. No announcement was made, so this Monday will be the next opportunity to tell the public whether or not the issue will get its day in court.

Several legal precedents are at stake: whether or not the Constitution allows for citizens to marry regardless of sexual orientation, and the related issue of federal benefits for same sex couples. Accordingly, the legality of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which federally prohibits same sex marriage, and California’s Proposition 8, would be challenged.

According to the AP, if there is no decision on Monday, the next justice meeting is in a week’s time, and will be the final one before the January recess. If a case is heard, it will occur in the spring, and a final verdict could be expected in June 2013. History may be made, or the court could continue to dodge the debate. We’ll know by Christmas

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Marni Chan

Marni has a M.A. from NYU's Arthur Carter Journalism Institute's Cultural Reporting and Criticism Program, where she studied under Susie Linfield, Katie Roiphe, and Dennis Lim. She also has a B.A. in history and politics from Pomona College. Marni has previously written for Forbes, AOL, and Conde Nast Traveler.

MORE FROM

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.