Syria War: 5 Reasons Why the US is About to Go to War With Syria

UPDATED COVERAGE: Live Updates and Full Coverage As U.S. Weighs Air Strikes

The Syrian revolution has turned into a civil war, with over 40,000 people dead and counting, adding to the instability of the Middle East. The conflict continues to keep the Arab, European and American foreign ministers and diplomats awake at night. This seems to be hopefully coming to an end, if one connects the dots and sees what the EU foreign ministers, the Russians and the American establishment are doing. The potential use of chemical weapons by the Assad regime may be the tipping point and if that is the case, then Assad’s days may actually be numbered. This time around, American involvement may speed things up and help deliver justice to the Syrian people. Here are five reasons why I believe the U.S administration will take the lead and help topple the Assad regime:

1. Regional approval and international support: The UN brokered peace plans initiated earlier this year never went ahead and Kofi Annan quit, citing lack of action. He cited lack of international community’s unity in solving this problem. Perhaps, this is forthcoming in a military action against Syria. Though this should be the last resort, it seems inevitable, given that this has dragged on for over two years. The fact that the Arab League has sanctions in place from November 2011, and there is consensus that the Assad regime is doing more harm than good. What is needed is a Security Council resolution to make any intervention legitimate.

2. Tipping point reached: The rumors that Syria may use Chemical weapons against the rebels is persistent, while an Al Jazeera report says that the U.S has not taken any hard steps to stop the killings. In Libya, the criterion was being on the “edge of being on an atrocity.” Chemical weapons may be this criterion for U.S involvement and the American stance seems to be getting stronger. A recent Guardian news item pointed towards some evidence about the presence of chemical weapons. While the deaths of 40,000 plus people is reason enough to intervene, the magnitude may increase more if these weapons are indeed used against the rebels and civilian population.

3. The Assad regime is a nuisance to the world: Apart from killing its own people and contributing to a humanitarian disaster, Syria is creating a very unstable Middle East. With an estimated 11,000 refugees leaving the country daily, the Assad regime is a good candidate as a war criminal for the Hague tribunal, once the dust settles down.

4. A viable transition: The emergence of a coalition of Syrian rebels, who may replace and fill the power vacuum after Assad’s transition. While this may not be a as smooth as one imagines, there is reason to believe that this is true, considering that there was consensus in Doha, a few weeks ago.

5. A "just" war: While the parallels with the Iraqi invasion are being drawn, I believe an intervention in Syria will be fundamentally different, in several aspects. The key one being that there is widespread support for action against the Assad regime, which seems to have lost legitimacy in the international community.

A realist would look at this situation and say that the Assad regime has exhausted any goodwill it had (soft-power) and is close to losing its battle with the rebels too (hard-power). Given this situation, the only alternative is for the situation to continue as it is, and for more chaos, or for the international community to come together and get closure on this issue, which has festered for too long; with an inconclusive outcome. 

While I disagree with Samuel Huntington on many of his theories, his observation about transiting political order holds true in this case. He famously said in his first book The Political order in Changing Societies, "the primary problem is not liberty but the creation of a legitimate public order. Men may of course have order without liberty but they cannot have liberty without order.” Assad’s regime has lost its claim to be a legitimate order, and the world must step in to ensure there is liberty with some order and Syria does not descend into anarchy.

American involvement in this case may be a blessing and I believe that with Arab support and UN legitimacy, Assad’s regime should go.

READ MORE: 11 facts about the country we're about to bomb

CHEAT SHEET: How to Write For Or Against U.S. Intervention

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Sabith Khan

Sabith Khan is a social entrepreneur, researcher and founder of MENASA, a think-tank and policy shop engaged in issues related to MENA and South Asia. Sabith has worked for several years in the field of strategic communications, public affairs and nonprofit management, trying to understand and communicate issues pertaining to civil society, development and youth in the US and MENA region. Sabith has worked with several large global public affairs firms, on award-winning campaigns in healthcare, entertainment and government relations. During his stint at Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide, he ideated and executed a global award-winning campaign for Apollo Hospitals (Abby and Clio Awards). He has also worked in the Middle East managing accounts as diverse as Dubai Film Festival, Mohammed bin Rashid Foundation, Dubai International Film Festival, Dubai School of Government. Most recently, he served as the Executive Director of Muslim Public Service Network in Washington D.C, an NGO that engages and inspires young American Muslims to do public service. He is currently pursuing a PhD in Planning Governance and Globalization at Virginia Tech. He has been involved as a team member and leader in several international development projects including consulting for the Near East Foundation, in helping set up their Monitoring and Evaluation system for their offices across the MENA region. Sabith has a Master of Public administration and a Master of Arts in International Relations from the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. In Summer 2013, he conducted research on American Muslim philanthropy at the Lilly School of Philanthropy, Indianapolis, in an attempt to map giving behavior among Muslims over the last ten years i.e., 2002- 2012. Sabith’s research interests include Religion and Philanthropy, Youth issues in USA, Middle East North Africa and South Asia, Governance and Civil Society. Sabith is also the co-editor of Millennials Speak: Essays on the 21st century, a snapshot of the ideas and opinions of the global Millennial Generation. Twenty writers from five continents, a diverse mix of young academics, policy professionals, and future thought and creative leaders, cover topics from the legacy of the Arab Spring, the global food system, the U.S. student loan crisis, youth unemployment, to popular culture. Currently working: Founder and Executive Director, MENASA Publications: 1. Humanitarian Aid and Faith-Based Giving: The Potential of Muslim Charity - Unrest Magazine, George Mason University. May 2013. Accessible at http://www.unrestmag.com/about-unrest/past-issues/#sthash.GEqNfv0U.dpuf 2. Arab American Diaspora and American Muslim Philanthropy: impact of crisis situations on mobilization and formation of a “community.” American University in Cairo Press. Cairo. (NP). Expected Fall 2013. 3. Middle-East Peace Talks 2010: Investigating the Role of Lobbying and Advocacy Groups in Washington, D.C. as Spoilers. Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. Spring 2011. Accessible at : http://www.maxwell.syr.edu/parcc/Research/intrastate/Spoilers_of_Peace_Project/ Blog: www.sabithkhan.wordpress.com

MORE FROM

New White House communications director Scaramucci says press briefings should be on-camera

If the new White House communications director gets his way, the press briefings could soon be recorded once again.

At least 8 dead, 30 injured in locked tractor trailer outside Walmart in Texas

Authorities told press that the deaths were caused by "a human trafficking crime."

Amid new revelations, here’s what we’ve learned about the Russian lawyer who met with Trump Jr.

The picture of Natalia Veselnitskaya is coming into clearer focus.

Republican Senator urges whoever leaked Russia/Sessions phone calls to release whole conversation

Sen. Chuck Grassley wants the person who leaked intelligence about Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak to come forward with more information.

Donald Trump Jr. and Paul Manafort now to testify before Senate committee behind closed doors

Trump Jr. and Manafort have avoided a subpoena and will testify behind closed doors — for now.

Hope Hicks reportedly tried to rein Trump in during explosive ‘Times’ interview. It didn’t work.

The low-profile Trump Whisperer is one of the few in the president's orbit to enjoy job security.

New White House communications director Scaramucci says press briefings should be on-camera

If the new White House communications director gets his way, the press briefings could soon be recorded once again.

At least 8 dead, 30 injured in locked tractor trailer outside Walmart in Texas

Authorities told press that the deaths were caused by "a human trafficking crime."

Amid new revelations, here’s what we’ve learned about the Russian lawyer who met with Trump Jr.

The picture of Natalia Veselnitskaya is coming into clearer focus.

Republican Senator urges whoever leaked Russia/Sessions phone calls to release whole conversation

Sen. Chuck Grassley wants the person who leaked intelligence about Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak to come forward with more information.

Donald Trump Jr. and Paul Manafort now to testify before Senate committee behind closed doors

Trump Jr. and Manafort have avoided a subpoena and will testify behind closed doors — for now.

Hope Hicks reportedly tried to rein Trump in during explosive ‘Times’ interview. It didn’t work.

The low-profile Trump Whisperer is one of the few in the president's orbit to enjoy job security.