Marijuana Legalization: Top 4 Reasons To Legalize Hemp Too

In the recent elections, we saw two different states legalize the use of marijuana, a progressive piece of legislation and a slippery one to be sure. This is great news for those who enjoy smoking pot, but what those who wish to use hemp? Is that now legal? If not, it should be for its multiple uses.

Here are just a few of it's practical applications:

1. Hemp can be used as a biofuel. Instead of depending on oil forever, we can start using hemp to run our cars. It grows nearly everywhere, so land used to grow food would not be impinged upon, and it grows quickly.

2. Hemp fibers can be compressed so that they can be used in making building materials like two-by-fours. Check out this video:  


If it were used in this way, we would not have to worry so much about destroying trees and the consequences that follow.

3. Hemp can be used for clothing. And, no, it doesn't always like you are wearing a burlap sack. Some hemp textiles are very stylish.

4. Hemp can also be used to make paper, and by this, I do not mean rolling papers for weed. Although, I guess that would make sense, especially in Colorado and Washington. The point is, however, that this product can be used for a wide range of commodities that would have inherent economic value. So if it is legal in Colorado and Washington to smoke marijuana and grow up to six plants, why not hemp?

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Danny Keener

My name is Danny Keener, and I am an English teacher at Santa Ana College and Chaffey College. My students ask me all the time if I am a conservative or a liberal. My answer is always the same: I don't think of myself as a conservative; I don't think of myself as a liberal; I simply think of myself as thinking for myself. And I ask them to do the same.

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