Obesity Crisis: Obese British to Lose Welfare if They Don't Exercise: Should America Follow Suit?

Some overweight British citizens could lose their welfare benefits if they don't complete a doctor-recommended exercise regimen, reported TIME

The city of London is considering the measure, recommended by the Westminster Council and local think tank The Local Government Information Unit (LGiU), as part of a cost-savings plan in preparation for the transferring of $3.25 million in public money from Britain's national health service into the municipality. 

Jonathan Carr-West, chief executive of the LGiU, said that the proposal is a "win-win" solution, as it saves the city money while contributing to make citizens healthier in "innovative ways."

The "behaviors that promote public health" could be monitored by using "smart cards" to determine how much exercise citizens who've been ordered to work out more are getting.

The idea is to "vary their subsidized housing and tax payments to either reward or incentivize them based on how much exercise they do."

According to TIME, more than 22% of British adult are obese. The UK spends $179 billion in health-related expenses.

Read on TIME.

Should America follow suit? 

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