Lashkar-e-Jhangavi Terror Group Sets Off Multiple Bombs in Pakistan: 120 Killed, 265 Injured

As many as 100 people were killed and 200 injured in suicide and car bomb blasts in Quetta's Alamdar Road area on Thursday. Before the twin blasts, in the afternoon a bomb detonated near a vehicle of security forces in the center of the city. Two cameramen from private TV channels, a computer operator of a news agency, nine police personnel, and two officials number among the dead. A majority of the people killed in the Alamdar Road blast were from the Hazara Shia community.

The banned sectarian militant organization Lashkar-e-Jhangavi claimed responsibility for the blasts on Alamdar Road.

Hamid Shakil, the deputy inspector general of the police, told journalists that 81 people have been killed, and more than 120 injured, including 10 army and paramilitary personnel in two blasts. The death toll may rise, due to the serious condition of the severely injured people, he added.

The first blast took place in a snooker club on Alamdar Road when people were busy playing the game. Several people were killed or injured in the blast. They were told that it seemed to be a suicide bomb blast.

Police, people who lived in the area, workers from social organizations, and media teams rushed to the site of the explosion soon after the first blast, and started taking the injured to hospitals.

A second blast took place just 10 minutes later than the first one, outside the snooker club, where a large number of people, police, rescue workers and journalists were still gathered. The majority of people were killed in the second blast.

Another blast hit Swat Valley. It disrupted a religious gathering at a Tableeghi [religious preacher] center killing at least 25 and injuring 70 people, in the once militant-infested district of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa. Deputy commissioner told media that cause of the blast is still unknown. "We are in the process of investigation," he said.

Hundreds of people got together for special Thursday night prayers at the religious preaching center.

Security forces cordoned the area. The dead and injured were taken to hospital in Saidu Sharif, where a senior doctor confirmed that the bodies and wounded showed signs of a bomb attack. There was a smell of explosives. Some bodies of the wounded had cuts caused by shrapnel and ball bearings always used in explosive devices, casualty medical officer Dr. Iqbal noted.

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Malik Achakzai

Being freelancer, contributing writer, pundit, reader, rest lover and interested in Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Iran, Central Asia, China, Russia and American Politics, International Relations, Political Economy, Human Rights, Health, Ecology, Geography, Archaeology, Theology, Buddhism. I completed my two years of master's from the department of Mass Communication at University of Baluchistan at Quetta. Before completing my master I had already joined reporting for local news papers in Balochistan and had already started freelancing to various Pashto, Urdu, English organizations. Voice of America (VoA) Ashna Radio Pashto service for which I have been freelancing since 2009 till the date. I do report for another online Pashto organization having news and views both from Afghanistan, Pakistan and the world, focusing on politics, war, human rights, sports and entertainment. I have been working as pundit for PolicyMic.com a NY based organization [PolicyMic is our generation’s platform to make our voices heard. We reach millions of people with our high-quality, personal analysis on the news, policy, and pop culture that’s changing our world] since December 2011. I did report as Lahore city correspondent for a Pakistani News Paper Express Tribune, an affiliated News organization with New York Times International, And have contributed reporting to Afghanistan Times an English daily at Kabul, Afghanistan. I am an alumni of German organization Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung and was part of its Afghan-Pak Young Journalist Exchange program in 2012 titled as "understanding the neighbors", when we together with Young Afghan journalists produced researched based stories both in Pakistan and Afghanistan [Khyber Pashtunkhwa, Islamabad and Kabul were visited during program]. I was part of Deutsche Welle Akademie program "Train The Trainer for Journalists in Crisis Regions" training in 2013. Now I am part of United Press International (UPI) Next and Truth Tracker reporters team from the Pakistani volatile province of Balochistan.

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