7 Things Republicans Are Talking About At the House GOP Retreat, Narrated in GIFs

House Republicans have currently retreated to a golf resort in Williamsburg, Virginia, for three days to work on repairing the damage done to their party after the 2012 elections, according to the Washington Post. "This is about tone," said Virginia Governor Robert McDonnell on Thursday. "It’s about messaging and it’s about showing people what we’re for instead of what we’re against." The advice already given includes treating rape as a "four-letter word ... don't say it," reports WaPo.

So what's happening behind those closed doors? Luckily, Slate's David Weigel managed to get ahold of a partial events schedule. Here's what we know about the retreat events so far, illustrated in GIFs.

1. Polling Session: What Happened and Where Are We Now?


I'm hoping there's at least one cry of "Witch!" when Nate Silver comes up.

2. What is the Role Of the Republican Majority in the 113th Congress?


Besides budget-trimming and trying to repeal Obamacare or its provisions, that is.

3. American Trends: How Is America Changing?


Aka, failing to recognize that appealing to traditional voting blocks may no longer suffice. Or as Bill O'Reilly put it, "The white establishment is now the minority."

4. Who Speaks For Middle America?


Who speaks for the sub-altern, is my question. But that's probably not going to appeal to Middle America, so maybe the GOP is on track with this one.

5. How to Communicate Principles in Today's Media Environment


Spin it however you want, I say. Don't let yourself be dictated to by facts.

6. Common Ethics Pitfalls


Resist it!

7. Successful Communication With Minorities and Women


Conservative scholar Christina Hoff Sommers recently observed, "I’m not sure what’s worse: conservatives ignoring women’s issues, or conservatives addressing them." I guess this panel will let us know.

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Sam Meier

Samantha Meier serves as the Identities editor at PolicyMic, where she writes on activism, gender, and new media. Sam was profiled in the New York Times for co-founding Sex Week at Harvard, and is currently working on a book about women and underground comix. Originally from Flagstaff, Arizona, she currently lives in New York.

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