Obama Climate Change: How to Push Him Into Action in His Second Term

The bloom is back on the rose. Since President Obama's strong words on climate in his inaugural speech, Facebook and the blogosphere have been abuzz with climate hopefuls. The consensus is that Obama has always really wanted to act on climate and has simply been stymied by opposition forces. This time around, though, the gloves are off. The executive branch is back in action. Forward climate action!

Before we break out the champagne, though, I think our community needs to remember something: Barack Obama is a politician. He is facing a second term where climate will not be on Congress' agenda. He knows that the environmental community worked itself into a frenzy over his perceived failure to lead during his first term. The words of a speech cost no more than the air. The inaugural address is an opportunity to pacify angry constituents by recognizing their concerns. Just as Obama included representatives of key communities in the inauguration ceremonies, he recognized another group of discontented supporters — i.e. climate activists — in his speech.

Let's assume for the moment that the Obama administration does hope to act on climate. Here are the political realities: Every time the executive branch moves to exercise its authority — for example, to regulate some industry through the Department of Energy or the EPA — the Republicans will react with vigorous opposition. They will threaten Democratic leaders politically. They will hold press conferences. In the House, GOP leaders will hold hearings, subpoena officials, and try to cut funding. Republicans will, in other words, make the administration's life difficult. Facing these challenges, the executive branch will occasionally, and perhaps frequently, back down. This is politics.

The question then becomes: What can the environmental community do to encourage the Obama administration to follow through on its commitments?

To answer this question, we need to take a short step back. Over the last few weeks, many of the major climate analysts have resurfaced a dormant debate over the failure of climate legislation back in 2009-2010. The major question on the table is how to allocate the blame and in particular how much blame the White House deserves for not making climate a greater priority. This is difficult to resolve. As I note in a recent report on climate in the 111th Congress, actually measuring the influence of a president on a given issue is impossible. I happen to think that presidential leadership matters a great deal; after all, the last major overhaul of our energy system happened under President Carter. Carter was a terrible politician and yet still succeeded because energy reform was his top objective.

But whatever your opinion, most commentators agree on one thing: Climate has not been the Obama administration's highest priority. Historical inquiry aside, the more relevant issue is not the effects of his inaction but their cause. We need to know why Obama failed to make climate the linchpin of his first term. The answer to that question will help us develop a strategy for making sure climate doesn't get ignored this time around.

In my report, I suggest that the environmental movement had a strong inside-the-Beltway strategy for climate legislation. What they lacked was an equally strong outside-the-Beltway strategy and, in particular, the capacity to shift public opinion and exercise political power at the local and state level. Though the advice is in danger of becoming rote, it remains true. Over the next four years, the Obama administration will respond only under pressure. The executive branch is in a constant balancing act amidst competing forces, and we will need to make sure that it tips in the right direction.

In other words, the environmental community needs to make failing to act on climate as onerous for the administration as acting on climate. For every oversight hearing that the Republicans convene in Congress, we need a protest around the White House grounds. For every threat of funding cuts by the GOP, we need a storm of petitions. If we can do that — if we can push not only with lobbyists and policy reports but also with demonstrations and public opinion polls — we can make Obama's words into promises, and his promises into action.

This article originally appeared on Grist.org.

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Nate Loewentheil

Nate Loewentheil is a second year student at Yale Law School, enrolled in a joint degree program with Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. He hails proudly from Baltimore, Maryland. In early 2005, while in his sophomore year at Yale College, he helped found the Roosevelt Campus Network (www.rooseveltcampusnetwork.org) and later served from 2007 to 2009 as executive director. During his time there, he helped expand the organization from a college start-up to a robust national progressive organizations with nearly 100 chapters, seven full-time staff and a $750,000 budget. Following this, he spent a year working in Cochabamba, Bolivia on water provision in rural areas. Most recently, he spent a summer working on urban policy at the Domestic Policy Council at the White House. Nate sits on the Board of Directors of the New Leaders Council and the Founders Board of PolicyMic.com. He has submitted testimony to Congress on topics like Social Security, published with the Center for American Progress and the Review of Policy Research, and contributes to the Huffington Post. He is a member of the Royal Society of Arts of England and the Sandbox Network. He is also the editor of a 2008 book, Thinking Big: Progressive Ideas for a New Era.

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