Asteroid LIVE: Watch Online Here

People in the Eastern Hemisphere may be able to spot Asteroid DA14 2012's flyby with the help of strong binoculars or a small telescope. However, NASA will provide a Ustream feed of the flyby from a telescope at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama (the broadcast starts at 3:00 p.m. and goes until 6:00 p.m. (PST) on February 15. Slooh.com will also be streaming live images from two observatories of the flyby (also goes from 3:00  to 6:00 p.m. PST). Similarly, The Clay Center Observatory in Brookline, Massachusetts, will live streaming from the observatory's Ustream channel.

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