10 States That Will Be Dramatically Affected By Sequestration

Tensions are at a high in Washington as Congress battles a sequester plan that could result in an $85 billion reduction in spending on a wide array of government agencies and state programs. This week marks the final days both houses will have to vote on the federal budget, and the strong partisan divide is not benefiting the voting process.

President Obama is urging for his deficit plan to be passed instead of sequestration. However, the GOP are strong advocates of the sequester, and will not accept tax hikes for wealthy Americans. If the GOP has high hopes of getting the sequester plan signed into law, then significant moderations will have to be made. With the Republicans unwilling to compromise, the country will be anticipating the final decision on March 2.

The White House released documents Sunday outlining the details of the sequester for all 50 states. Here is a look at 10 states that will be majorly impacted by the sequester.

1. New York:


Photo Credit: Jim Hendersen

The Empire State will lose roughly $42.7 million in education funding. Over 4,000 eligible students will lose the opportunity for work study. Over a million dollars will be cut from improving the public health system.

2. Ohio:


Photo Credit: U.S. Army

An estimated 26,000 military based jobs will receive less pay. Ohio could lose nearly $7 million in funding for environmental protection on water quality. Over $1 million will be cut from public health care, resulting in thousands of fewer HIV tests.

3. Florida:


Photo Credit: KnightLago

Florida’s education system could worsen, thanks to $54.5 million in lost funding. Nearly $1 million could be lost in law enforcement programs such as crime and prevention education. Half a million dollars could be reduced in vaccination funding, resulting in roughly 7,500 children not receiving vital vaccines.

4. Arizona:


Photo Credit: Wing-Chi Poon

About $718,000 will be cut in job search assistance and employment training programs. Over $1 million will be skimmed from nutritional assistance programs for senior citizens. About $17.7 million will be cut for education services.

5. Texas:


Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

Over $2 million will be cut in public health services, including a nearly $7 million dollar cut for substance abuse programs. About 52,000 military employees will have pay reductions.

6. Louisiana:


Photo Credit: John Messina

Nearly $10 million will be lost in education for children with disabilities. $2.5 million will be reduced in clean air and water programs.

7. Maryland:


Photo Credit: Ladyb695

$14.4 million will be lost in education funding for primary and secondary schools. The state will lose about $550,000 for health care agencies, and an additional $595,000 resulting in nearly 15,000 fewer HIV tests.

8. Illinois:


Photo Credit: N Kent Loudon

14,000 civilian military members will have less annual gross pay. $1.4 million will be cut in job search and training programs. $6.4 million will be lost for funding environmental policy measures.

9. Indiana:


Photo Credit: FTSKfan

$13.8 million would be lost for education, affecting about 12,000 students. $820,000 will be cut in providing nutritional meals to eligible seniors. 11,000 military employees will receive pay cuts.

10. California:


Photo Credit: U.S. Navy

$87.6 million will be cut in education services. Nearly 10,000 students will not receive work study financial aid. 64,000 military personal will have pay reductions.

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Shawna Gillen

Shawna is currently studying Political Science and Psychology at Marist College. She has a passion for politics and is an aspiring lawyer. In her spare time she likes to play club women's rugby, and contributes as the Co-News Editor for Marist's student newspaper.

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