Women's History Month 2013: March Celebrates Women in STEM

March marks "Women's History Month." This year's theme is “Women Inspiring Innovation through Imagination: Celebrating Women in Science, Math, Technology, Engineering and Mathemetics.” 

This year’s efforts are to focus on promoting STEM (science, technology, engineering, and Math) programs for women and encouraging younger women who are interested in these fields to pursue their dreams. There are multiple events and workshops being held in order to inform and engage youth about opportunities within these areas, and this is great given how few women work in scientific fields.

Here is a video that explains a little more in depth what women have done in science:


Even though the focus is on women of science, you cannot forget the women in the suffrage movement, women in World War II and many other important things women have done throughout history.

Women's History Month spawned from a small-town event in California. The origins to become nationally recognized happened when Congress passed Pub L97-28 proclaiming the week of March 7, 1982 “Women’s History Week.” The next 5 yearsOver the next five years, Congress passed resolutions to continue on L97-28. In 1987, the National Women's History Project pushed for March 1987 as “Women’s History Month.” Since then, presidents have continued passing resolutions to recognize March as “Women’s History Month.”

Of course, a lot of you might wonder why we don't celebrate men in a Men's History Month and that this is reverse discrimination. But to be perfectly honest, most of history is told from a man's perspective anyway, which was why there was a need have a recognition of women's history.

Opinions aside, it is good that we recognize people for their achievements. It's important to recognize any person — regardless of their race, sex, gender, religion, sexual orientation, political affiliation, and any other category — for their accomplishments.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Michelle Adams

Currently serving as an AmeriCorps member at the Michigan Coalition Against Homelessness with the Campaign to End Homelessness program, Michelle is passionate about ending homelessness. She graduated with a B.A. in Communication and a specialization in public relations and a minor in sexuality and conflict/management from Michigan State University. Her interests lie in writing about culture, sexuality/gender and homelessness. Offline she enjoys quoting How I Met Your Mother, volunteering, swinging at parks and stargazing.

MORE FROM

What does Sean Spicer’s resignation mean for the rest of Trump’s inner circle?

Many are already wondering if Spicer's departure could portend more shakeups to come.

How the messy New York City subways are hurting vulnerable New Yorkers the most

The New York subway system is a mess — and here's who's suffering the most.

Is Sean Spicer the shortest-serving White House press secretary in history?

Spicer served just six months as press secretary — there are some cabinet members in White House history who have served mere days.

5 stories from this week that aren't about OJ Simpson or Sean Spicer

The White House will be forced to release logs from Mar-a-Lago, and Democrats finally have an agenda.

According to Anthony Scaramucci’s Twitter, he believes in climate change and voted for Barack Obama

He also supports same-sex marriage. And abortion rights.

Trump is reportedly looking into pardoning himself. Here’s why that could backfire.

Can the president really pardon himself?

What does Sean Spicer’s resignation mean for the rest of Trump’s inner circle?

Many are already wondering if Spicer's departure could portend more shakeups to come.

How the messy New York City subways are hurting vulnerable New Yorkers the most

The New York subway system is a mess — and here's who's suffering the most.

Is Sean Spicer the shortest-serving White House press secretary in history?

Spicer served just six months as press secretary — there are some cabinet members in White House history who have served mere days.

5 stories from this week that aren't about OJ Simpson or Sean Spicer

The White House will be forced to release logs from Mar-a-Lago, and Democrats finally have an agenda.

According to Anthony Scaramucci’s Twitter, he believes in climate change and voted for Barack Obama

He also supports same-sex marriage. And abortion rights.

Trump is reportedly looking into pardoning himself. Here’s why that could backfire.

Can the president really pardon himself?