Mike McLelland Death: Did Aryan Brotherhood Shoot Him and His Wife?

Texas District Attorney Mike McLelland, 63, and his wife, Cynthia were found dead from gunshot wounds in an allegedly targeted attack on Saturday.

A mass hunt for the killer(s) has gone underway in Texas, leaving an air of fear and speculation in its wake. There is heavy speculation that a white supremacist group may be the tying link between the McLelland tragedy and the January death of Mark Hasse, who was the D.A.’s assistant. The Kaufman County district attorney’s office was one of many that investigated criminal charges made on the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas. The Brotherhood is a prison gang that involves itself in many aspects of organized crime with influence both in and outside of the jail cell.

In July of 2012, a member of the group was sentenced to life in prison. The following November, Houston prosecutors indicted 34 members of the group which was said to be a “devastating blow.”

Before the deaths of the McLellands, another unusual case occurred earlier this month in which a Colorado prisoner on parole, Even Ebel, was killed in a shootout not far from Kaufman County. It is said that Ebel may possibly have ties to a Colorado-based supremacist group and the F.B.I were investigating any possible links between Ebel and the Hasse case.

After the death of Hasse, McLelland said at a news conference of his deputy, “I hope that the people that did this are watching, because we’re very confident that we’re going to find you.” He began to carry a gun around with him thereafter as a means of protection. Now in light of McLelland’s death, the Hasse case remains unsolved to this day. According to the New York Times, a law official believes while the two deaths may be related, the culprit behind both crimes are different. It was suggested that the killer(s) involved in the McLellands’ case might have been more experienced than that of the Hasse case based on the presence of shelling cases.

The McLellands leave behind three sons and two daughters. 

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Zainab Akande

Born and raised in New York City, Zainab is a University of Delaware alum, currently working on obtaining her M.A. in journalism at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism in New York. http://zainabakande.com/

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