9 Funniest Kim Jong-un Memes

As North Korea continues to rattle the world, Kim Jong Un’s chubby little cheeks and lovable demeanor are finally trending on the web. Here are the nine funniest Kim Jong-un memes I’ve come across so far. Laugh at these, mock him, and ridicule the media hype. But after that, please come back and read this great article in The Atlantic that explains why we laugh at North Korea while we fear Iran when both of them pose very serious nuclear threats.  

1. Dad’s Dead


When Kim Jong-Il passed away, he left us with the best parting gift we could wish for: a young dictator who hasn’t been partying enough.

2. I Eat It


What is the point of holding onto all the food in the country and letting all the children starve, if our supreme leader is not well fed?

3. Launch? I Said Lunch


He might make some really bad mistakes like this one.

4. Leadership


Now that’s what I’m talking about!

5. Stop Laughing I'm Serious


Kim can finally get back to work. No no no why are you laughing? He’s dead serious, guys!

6. Choose your weapon


Believe me, he’s really serious! He even got the best weapon of rock-paper-scissors: Atom!

7. What Do You Mean


Obviously, meeting the president of the country you’re threatening to nuke is part of the job. What?! That wasn’t President Obama? Was he at least a celeb?

8. America


Damn USA, always getting in the way! I’m just trying to do my job!

9. Wanted


This image was actually posted on the official Flickr website of North Korea, after “hacktivist” group, Anonymous, hacked into its Flickr, Twitter, and Uriminjokkiri official propaganda website. Thanks to Anonymous’ efforts, we could see this incredible image on North Korea’s official Flickr account.

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Jinyoung Park

Born and raised in Korea and graduated from Williams College, Jinyoung often finds herself in between two different worlds. Yet, her wandering feet syndrome has been pushing her to experience even more worlds, including China, Argentina, India, and Japan. Right now, she is in Washington D.C. peeking into the world of foreign policy.

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