Pakistan Elections 2013: Imran Khan Could Be Country's Only Hope

At this point many Western policymakers see little hope in a stable Pakistan and are beginning to view the former ally as part of a new axis of evil. Nevertheless, Pakistanis have not given up hope on their country — and for good reason.

What many Western leaders fail to recognize is the difference between the state of Pakistan and the extremists harboring inside the country. The problems of violence and fanaticism are rooted in the Taliban that inhabit Pakistan. If Pakistan wants the international respect it so desires, then its government must identify the Taliban and its various offshoots as an enemy of peace and civility.

One of the many problems with the Pakistani government is its lack of control over domestic terrorism. Extremists know how inept their government is and can subsequently empower their supporters. However, this could all change with the recent dissolution of Pakistan’s legislative body and the forthcoming elections. Nevertheless, citizens are weary of the probability of change after years of hopes for a renewal of democracy have been shattered. From 2012-2013, Pakistan went through four prime ministers, Yousuf Raza Gilani, Makhdoom Shahabuddin, and Raja Pervaiz Ashraf, and Mir Hazar Khan Khoso, the current interim PM. The former three were all sacked from their jobs through various corruption scandals or illegalities. So, the Pakistanis may have good reason for their loss of hope.

They need not look far for potential providers of a new Pakistan. Parliament’s elections are in May and they then choose the Prime Minister. The three likely candidates in the May election are Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, Nawaz Sharif, and Imran Khan.

Nawaz Sharif, leader of the Pakistani Muslim League, has been in power before and has been involved with his fair share of controversies in the past. During his tenure as Prime Minister, Sharif attempted to implement “Sharia law” and was ousted by a military coup after “money laundering” allegations. Now, his party has become a more moderate conservative party with a “pro-business” party platform. Sharif remains the frontrunner as his PML polls with the most support.

Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, son of President Asif Ali Zardari and former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, is relatively new to Pakistani politics thus little can be said about the co-chairman of the Pakistan People’s Party.  Nevertheless, his party has a colorful history in Pakistan championing various leftist ideologies while being marred with corruption allegations (Bilawal’s mother), executions (Bilawal’s grandfather), and more corruption (Bilawal’s father). Imran Khan, the renowned cricket player turned politician and leader of Tehreek-e-Insaf, is spearheading the newest national party which thus far has been free of corruption or controversy.

Tehreek-e-Insaf provides Pakistan with a fresh face for a country in turmoil. Imran Khan, though leading the least experienced party, has made decisive standpoints on the route Pakistan should take out of this disarray. Along with important social issues, Khan has made clear of his animosity towards Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, the Taliban, and other militant groups in Pakistan stating that there will be “no future for the country if terrorism is not controlled.”

Khan and his party have proposed a completely revamped US-Pakistan relationship. Contrasting prior politicians’ submission to “U.S. authority,” Khan has been widely critical of US policy in Pakistan, particularly drone strikes. Khan maintains that drone strikes are a “major stimulant to terrorism” ensuring the opposite of their intent. He refuses to let Pakistan continue to be America’s puppet.

For Pakistan, that is what is necessary. Pakistanis need a leader unafraid of terrorists, the US, or international allies. At this point in time, what Pakistan needs most is a leader who cares about his country first and foremost. Though we cannot be certain that any of the three primary candidates will put their country first, Imran Khan is the only candidate whose party remains stain-free. So, why not trust him?

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Usamah Andrabi

Sophomore at Cornell University. Studying Industrial and Labor Relations, with a focus in international and comparative labor, and a minor in Law & Society. Born and raised Texan.

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