Boston Massacre: New York Post Reportedly Gets Suspect ID Wrong

The Boston Police Department has said that no suspect has been taken into custody in connection with the explosions that occurred in Boston during the city's 117th marathon. A spokesman for the department said, 

"At this time, we haven't been notified of any arrests or anyone apprehended."

Earlier, the New York Post reported:

Investigators have a suspect — a Saudi Arabian national — in the horrific Boston Marathon bombings, The Post has learned.

Law enforcement sources said the 20-year-old suspect was under guard at an undisclosed Boston hospital.

It was not immediately clear why the man was hospitalized and whether he was injured in the attack or in his apprehension.

The man was caught less than two hours after the 2:50 p.m. bombing on the finish line of the race, in the heart of Boston.

"Honestly, I don't know where they're getting their information from, but it didn't come from us," said the Boston police spokesperson.

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