Boston College Students Organize Walk to Commemorate Bombing Victims

As of 4 PM on Tuesday, more than 13,000 people have pledged to walk from St. Ignatius Parish on the Boston College campus to Boston proper on Friday, April 19. The Facebook page for this event is called, Boston Marathon: The Last 5, and it explains why BC students have started this event:

"In light of [Monday]'s tragedy, let's remember, honor, and stand up for all those affected by the incident that occurred at the 117th Boston Marathon. We invite everyone to join us on Friday, April 19 at 4:30pm to walk from BC to Boston to stand united. For anyone who did not get to finish, For anyone who was injured, and For anyone who lost their life...we will walk. We will walk to show that we decide when our marathon ends."

In other words, this isn't over until we say it is. I couldn't be prouder of my city or my school.

Meanwhile, in an op-ed for The Heights, Assistant Professor of Political Science Peter Krause encouraged the BC community to run with him in next year's marathon:

"People often ask me what average citizens can do in response to terrorism. Well, here is your answer: Make sure that next year’s Boston Marathon has more participants and spectators than any other in history. The people who carried out these attacks must be tracked down and punished by law enforcement, but we as a society get to decide if the attacks have a broader impact. We get to decide if we respond to these terrible acts with fear and hatred or with renewed community spirit.

"I hate to run and have never run more than five miles in my entire life, but I am running the Boston Marathon next year and I am raising money to send to the victims of this tragedy and the first responders who prevented an even greater one. Who is with me?"

 

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