North Korea Nuclear Strike Less Dangerous Than Democrats? Texas Attorney General Thinks So

The great political commentator, storyteller, and all-around lovely person Molly Ivins often began speeches to disgruntled and dejected liberal audiences with "Cheer up, folks. It could be worse; you could be living in Texas."

Exhibit A: Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, a man whose recent Twitter history includes such gems as:


AND


So yeah, he's that kind of Texas politician, so much so that he’s considered a possible successor to current Texas Gov. Rick "Good Hair" Perry. Hell, the man cut his teeth as Attorney General defending the presence of a Ten Commandments "monument" on the Texas Capitol, and has since followed up by threatening to arrest European election observers and inviting New York gun owners to flee to Texas. Sounds like a potential governor of Texas to me.

Little surprise, then, about a recent speech Mr. Abbott gave, in which he called the "threat" of Democratic gains in Texas an "assault far more dangerous than what the leader of North Korea threatened when he said he was going to add Austin, Texas, as one of the recipients of his nuclear weapons."

Aside from the obvious political logic of an uber-conservative not taking a nuclear threat to the Sodom and Gomorrah that is the People's Republic of Austin seriously, one can certainly understand what Mr. Abbott was saying on pure, old-fashioned foaming at the mouth hysterical terms. 

Fact is that Texas is pretty ripe fruit for Democrats moving forward, especially considering the rise of Latino Texans, many of whom might prefer "sí se puede" to "From my cold dead Hands."

Needless to say, if those folks in Austin (should it not become a nuclear "recipient" in the next several years) and throughout the rest of the state ever actually wield the political power that they’re projected to have, leaders like Attorney General Abbott and Governor Perry may have to make room for a new brand of Texan politician.

The eyes of Texas, and the rest of the country, would be on that, all the live-long day.

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Christopher Records

I'm a Special Education teacher at a high school in Southeast Los Angeles. Also going for a Master's in Public Policy at USC, part time. Rest of the time, I nosh with the fiance, construct sentences, read, run around the block, and drink interesting India Pale Ales. Left of center, gay, atheist, vegetarian, and unionized. I try to do everything in a happy, sunshiney, apple sauce kinda way.

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