Boston Marathon Bomber Caught? Boston Globe Says So

Editor's note: this is a rapidly unfolding story. Details below are those reported by the Boston Globe and 7 News Live and may not be accurate.

According to 7 News Live, a sprawling incident unfolding near MIT's Cambridge campus and in the nearby town of Watertown actually appears to be the capture of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects.

Various news sources are reporting that the Marathon bombing suspects were engaged in armed combat by police forces late Thursday night and early Friday morning. One is reported to remain at large; the status of the captured suspect, who may have been stripped of clothing to ensure he was not carrying an improvised explosive device, is currently unknown. Some sources claim that suspect has died.

7 News Tweets:


The Boston Globe similarly confirms, possibly from a different source:


 

Shortly before 11:00 p.m. EDT, a Massachussetts Institute of Technology police officer was shot multiple times and killed by unknown assailants.

In what has not been verified to be a connected incident, an apparent carjacking resulted in a police chase and shootout between two suspects and authorities in the nearby town of Watertown. It was reported that explosives were deployed against law enforcement officials in the chase, and one officer may have been injured. Video streaming live on CNN confirms at least several dozen shots were fired. One suspect was taken into custody, and another remains at large.

If the Globe is to be believed, what initially appeared to be an unconnected incident may in fact involve the apprehension of one of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects. However, it must be stressed that reports remain vague and unconfirmed. An FBI source told the Globe that it was too early to claim any connection.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

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