We Will Never Forget the Bravery of Boston's Heroes

I got to Emerson College in Boston, located near the site of explosions on Monday. The college is currently locked down along with Boston's one million people who were told by Governor Deval Patrick to stay indoors. An armed, dangerous suspect is on the loose just miles from me as our city is in chaos.

Even being relatively far from the situation, I'm hearing constant sirens and the occasional helicopter hum. I speak for myself, my fellow college students, and the rest of Boston when I say these past few hours have been shocking. A majority of our population woke up to the overwhelming news this morning. Neighbors in my residence hall were shocked, and as I type, we are gathered in the common room huddled around the television.

I feel safe. I feel safe because there are dozens of government agencies backed by the power of our federal government on everything. At the same time, I feel a sense of uncertainty. There is a terrorist on the loose who is armed with firearms and explosives. Although I know for a fact that the FBI and BPD are more than on top of the situation, you still have this fear. And that's what the suspect is trying to accomplish.

I refuse to be fearful, although I may feel some sense of fear. We here in Boston have full confidence in the authorities that protect us, one even sacrificing his life last night in trying to protect citizens.

These chaotic, historic moments will not be forgotten. Although this will be remembered for the extraordinary drama, it will also be remembered for the brave actions of our men and women working in law enforcement. Local and federal authorities have made an enormous sacrifice and are committed to protecting me, my friends, my family, this city, this country and this world. We will never forget that.

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Elliot Friar

I just really enjoy politics and pop culture. Follow me: @elliot_friar.

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