David Axelrod Admits "Government Is Too Vast" For Obama to Control

If I didn’t know any better, I’d say David Axelrod — Obama's top adviser — is sounding like a Republican:


Blaming bureaucrats for idiotic and dangerous actions? Government is simply too vast to control?

Whoa there. Let me see your credentials. You’re starting to sound too “extremist,” “dangerous” and “out of touch” with the American people, sir.

Of course, that’s what progressives and media pundits would be claiming if he happened to have an (R) next to his name.

But you have to admit, watching this White House scrambling to point fingers and shift the blame elsewhere on all these scandals is a little amusing.

“Spying on AP reporters’ phone records and sources? Hey, that was the deputy attorney general’s call, not ours! The IRS thing? Um … talk to Treasury. Benghazi? What about Benghazi? Oh, the talking points, that … um … that was CIA. No, I mean the State Department! Er, no CIA - hey, look over there!” (tires screeching)

Welcome to Washington, where there’s no such thing as personal accountability in the public sector.

So then why is it that every time someone talks of reducing government spending, size and scope back to a sane level of accountability and efficiency, they’re automatically labeled as “extremist,” “dangerous” and “out of touch?” I’d expect as much from big government Keynesian progressives, but what gets me is how enough of the American public freak out and buy all the hysteria every time (with the rare exceptions of 1994 and 2010).

It’s also nice to see the press stepping up to the plate and finally doing their job. They’ve had a school girl crush with Barack Obama for the last six years, and the infatuation finally seems to be wearing off. The press was crucifying Richard Nixon 40 years ago for doing exactly this kind of excessive abuses with federal power. I was beginning to wonder if the era of Woodward and Bernstein journalism was truly extinct of if they were finally going to stop bending over for this administration.

The Reporters Committee for Freedom even gathered a media coalition to protest Attorney General Eric Holder’s actions (finally) and released a letter that can be read here.

Naturally, Democrats will protest that this is nothing more that a “political witch hunt.” Funny how “it wasn’t” during Watergate, Iran-Contra or the Iraq War. Washington will do what it always does: politicize everything. You can’t take the politics out of politics.

But to simply dismiss any wrongdoing as “politics” is not right either. This administration has a long list of Constitutional abuses and overreaching federal power grabs as often as Nixon and Bush II on their best days. Progressives can’t take the FDR/Anastasio Somoza defense (“He may be a son of a bitch, but he’s our son of a bitch.”) and think they can bury these scandals with that.

More importantly, when will the majority of the American public finally realize what Axelrod just admitted in probably his most honest moment on television? That government has gotten too large to control.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

John Giokaris

John Giokaris has been contributing to PolicyMic since February 2011. Born and raised in Chicago, John graduated from Loyola University Chicago with a double major in Journalism and Political Science and is currently earning his J.D. at The John Marshall Law School. John believes in free market principles, private sector solutions, transparency, school choice, constitutionally limited government, and being a good steward of taxpayer dollars. His goals are to empower/create opportunity for citizens to use the tools at their disposal to succeed in America, which does more to grow the middle class and alleviate those in poverty than keeping a permanent underclass dependent on government sustenance indefinitely. Sitting on the Board of Directors for both the center-right Chicago Young Republicans and libertarian America's Future Foundation-Chicago, he is also a member of the free market think tank Illinois Policy Institute's Leadership Coalition team along with other leaders of the Illinois business, political, and media communities. John has seven years experience working in writing/publishing, having previously worked at Law Bulletin Publishing, the Tribune Company, and Reboot Illinois. His works have been published in the Chicago Tribune, U.S. News & World Report, Crain's Chicago Business, Reboot Illinois, Townhall, the Law Bulletin, and the RedEye. He's also made appearances on CBS News, PBS, and Al Jazeera America.

MORE FROM

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Pizzagate' shooter gets 4-year prison sentence, lawyers urged judge to deter vigilantism

Welch stormed a Washington, D.C., pizza place and shot off a firearm because of the internet.