Starving Children In North Korea React to Kim Jong-Un Like He's Justin Bieber

North Korean despot Kim Jong-Un and his wife visited the Myohyangsan Children’s Camp in the North Phyongan Province of North Korea on Sunday, where the faces of many hysterically crying children greeted him, emotional at the sight of their idol and supreme leader. This is a normal sight for Americans when it’s a bunch of screaming girls at a Justin Bieber concert; not starving children crying at the sight of their country’s leader.


[Source: Shanghaiist]

Kim Jong-un is probably used to making kids cry by now. 

Upon his visit to the camp, Kim Jong-un told the children that their camp was a large part of the "lifelong desire of the great Generalissimos Kim Il-sung and Kim Jong-Il, who did everything for the children as their tender-hearted fathers." He also listened to the children sing North Korean camp songs such as “We are the Happiest in the World” and “General to Front while Children to Camps.”


[Source: Shanghaiist]

He and his wife made their stop to the camp on their way to China on a trip to patch up diplomatic relations with their neighboring country, after Chinese fishermen were taken hostage by North Korean troops.


[Source: Shanghaiist]

However, this isn’t the only sight of crying children clamoring around North Korea’s supreme leader. Here are photos of crying children clinging to the leader that they refer to as “father.”

 


[Source: The Daily Mail]

But maybe the children are just crying because he’s so fat while they’re starving.

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