Amanda Bynes PSA: Tells Everybody to Stop Caring About Her Drama

Amanda Bynes is a pretty big deal right now. Her troubling and very public meltdown is 2013's equivalent of Charlie Sheen's #WINNING downturn.

Just like Sheen, the schadenfreude factor of Bynes' problems is prompting extensive coverage of Bynes' antics, which then further propels Bynes to do or say something more ridiculous resulting in more coverage.

The folks at Official Comedy decided to do something about this pathetic cycle. This hilarious and spot-on public service announcement captures the absurdity of the Bynes' phenomenon.


The hilariously grave video addresses the sad reality that Syrian rebels' freedom movement, or even the still striking Guantanamo Bay prisoners, are not getting even remotely the same amount of attention that Bynes' wigs are. It is only a matter of time before Bynes' coverage reaches media saturation, or something more pressing or absurd captures the attention of the public.

The upsetting reality is that Bynes is clearly going through a troubling phase. We, as consumers of her chaos, are making her meltdown a lucrative opportunity for media sites. The proof is in the numbers based on this graph from Google Trends. Maybe if we as a culture stopped paying attention to Bynes she will finally face the scary truth of her situation and seek out the help she needs.


Of course celebrity culture is not going anywhere with public celebrity meltdowns more amplified by social media and the Internet. Publicists' jobs have been made a whole lot more difficult by the speed and directness of information but we as a culture can choose to make a stand about what we care about.

As long as we drive up search results for what stupid/scary thing Amanda Bynes has done today, she will keep doing those things, and the media will keep covering it.

A pet, or a plant, or even a book is a definitely better use of our mind energy. And yet, this happened today:


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Shwetika Baijal

Shwetika is PolicyMic's first columnist and writes for the Millenials and the Media column. She focuses on how the media frames policy and cultural issues, how the media's framing effects public opinion, and in turn how public opinion affects the policies and issues under discussion.

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