Xbox 1: Microsoft Ditches "No Used Games" Policy, Always-On Feature

In a direct response to the outcry of gamers everywhere, Microsoft announced on Wednesday afternoon that it will change a number of its unpopular policies and requirements for the newly-introduced Xbox One.

Microsoft's president of interactive entertainment, Don Mattrick, wrote in a blog post (cooly titled "Your Feedback Matters"), "Since unveiling our plans for Xbox One, my team and I have heard directly from many of you, read your comments and listened to your feedback. I would like to take the opportunity today to thank you for your assistance in helping us to reshape the future of Xbox One."

There are two main issues that these changes will address.

First, according to Mattrick, the Xbox One will no longer require a constant broadband internet connection in order for users to play offline Xbox games. Previously, Microsoft had announced at the Electronics Entertainment Expo that the Xbox One would only be able to operate offline for a maximum of 24 hours, after which time players would have to find an internet connection or stop playing.

The revocation of this policy will come as a relief to members of the armed forces, who protested that they did not always have reliable internet access while depoyed abroad. Furthermore, the Xbox One will no longer be locked in certain regions such as Japan, Kuwait, or Afghanistan.

Second, Microsoft has repealed its draconian used-game measures, under which players were subjected to complicated restrictions on whether or not they could trade their games with other players. While the following Sony video —w hich was created in response to Microsoft's used-game rules — is no longer relevant, it's still funny:

The question is: Will Microsoft's announcement restore Xbox fans' faith in the company?

In its announcement, Don Mattrick made a great effort to stress that the experience of playing games on Xbox One will be "just like [it is] on Xbox 360."

Just one problem, Don: I already have an Xbox 360.