Republican House Passing More Bipartisan Legislation Than Democratic Senate

It was a busy day on Capitol Hill yesterday in an election year where many people aren’t expecting much action from Congress. The House passed a jobs bill targeted towards helping startup businesses by a large bipartisan vote of 390-23 while the Senate blocked approval of the Keystone XL pipeline once again despite a 56-42 majority vote, which included 11 Democrats.

Despite accusations of being “extremist,” “obstructionist,” and a “do nothing Congress,” it’s clearly evident that the Republican House is passing more bipartisan legislation than the Democratic Senate, or even the White House.

The six bills in the JOBS Act passed by the House would make it easier for small companies to go public by providing them a temporary reprieve from Securities and Exchange Commission regulations, removing SEC restrictions preventing small businesses from using advertisements to solicit investors, and removing SEC restrictions on “crowdfunding” so entrepreneurs can raise equity capital from a large pool of small investors.

For getting 148 votes from the opposing party, that sure doesn’t sound like “extremist” legislation to me. Not even all Democrats, moderate Republicans, and Independents could support President Barack Obama’s jobs bill.

In the Senate, despite a 56-42 bipartisan majority vote, the Democrats blocked approval of the Keystone XL pipeline once again due to lack of obtaining a filibuster-proof majority. Democratic Senators Max Baucus (D-Mont.); Mark Begich (D-Alaska); Kay Hagan (D-N.C.); Mary Landrieu (D-La.); Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.); Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.); Mark Pryor (D-Ark.); Jon Tester (D-Mont.); Jim Webb (D-Va.); Bob Casey (D-Pa.); and Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) all voted for the pipeline.

And Republicans are supposed to be the “obstructionists?"

For that matter, the GOP House is still the only entity in Washington that has even passed a 2012 budget, which the Senate killed. Meanwhile, it’s been more than 1,000 days since the Harry Reid-led Democratic Senate passed any budget, and Reid has publicly stated he has no intention to do so anytime soon.

But it’s the House Republicans who are the “do nothing Congress,” right?

The truth is there are several other golden opportunities for bipartisan cooperation that could solve a lot of other problems even in an election year, including pro-growth tax reform, which 36 Democrat, Republican, and Independent senators, 100 Republican and Democrat congressmen, the bipartisan “Gang of Six” plan, and the president’s own Simpson-Bowles debt commission have all come out in strong support for.

Liberals claim time and time again that it’s the Republicans who have drifted far right while the Democrats have “moved centrist.” Yet over the last year, it’s the Republican Party leadership that has worked toward bipartisan solutions like pro-growth tax reform, domestic energy development, and increasing access to credit for small business owners and entrepreneurs.

The far left leadership of the Democratic Party cares more about raising tax rates, appeasing environmentalists, subsidizing green energy campaign donors with taxpayer money, doubling down on out-of-control levels of spending, and blocking any entitlement reform.

This is the profile of a “centrist” Democratic Party? Compared to what? Lenin? Mao?

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

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John Giokaris

John Giokaris has been contributing to PolicyMic since February 2011. Born and raised in Chicago, John graduated from Loyola University Chicago with a double major in Journalism and Political Science and is currently earning his J.D. at The John Marshall Law School. John believes in free market principles, private sector solutions, transparency, school choice, constitutionally limited government, and being a good steward of taxpayer dollars. His goals are to empower/create opportunity for citizens to use the tools at their disposal to succeed in America, which does more to grow the middle class and alleviate those in poverty than keeping a permanent underclass dependent on government sustenance indefinitely. Sitting on the Board of Directors for both the center-right Chicago Young Republicans and libertarian America's Future Foundation-Chicago, he is also a member of the free market think tank Illinois Policy Institute's Leadership Coalition team along with other leaders of the Illinois business, political, and media communities. John has seven years experience working in writing/publishing, having previously worked at Law Bulletin Publishing, the Tribune Company, and Reboot Illinois. His works have been published in the Chicago Tribune, U.S. News & World Report, Crain's Chicago Business, Reboot Illinois, Townhall, the Law Bulletin, and the RedEye. He's also made appearances on CBS News, PBS, and Al Jazeera America.

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