Aurelia Fedenisn: Is the State Department Above the Law?

A whistleblower has come forward to claim that members of the State Department engaged in illegal activities. Computers from the whistleblower's lawyers have been stolen. Is this a random act, or part of a State Department coverup?

Aurelia Fedenisn worked for the State Department’s Inspector General (IG) office as an investigator. Her duties included inspections “of the approximately 260 embassies, diplomatic posts, and international broadcasting installations throughout the world to determine whether policy goals are being achieved and whether the interests of the United States are being represented and advanced effectively.” She also was involved in investigations concerning “instances of fraud, waste, and mismanagement that may constitute either criminal wrongdoing or violation of Department and BBG regulations.”

During her time at the IG office, Fedenisn identified several issues that brought a negative light to the State Department. These included personnel involved in sexual assaults, supporting prostitution, and drug use. Her reports were covered up by the State Department, prompting her to provide information to Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas).

Since then, Fedenisn and her children have been harassed by the State Department. Members of the State Department’s IG spoke to her children and never identified themselves. They also asked her children for their mother’s place of work and cell phone number. These aren't the actions of professionals, they're those of intimidators hiding behind a federal badge.

Reports now indicate a break-in at Fedenisn’s lawyers’ office. The thieves stole computers and broke into a file cabinet. They decided not to take silver coins or other computers from an unlocked office nearby. Instead, they targeted Fedenisn lawyer’s computers and files.

It's true that Hillary Clinton is no longer secretary of state. She is now running (unofficially) for president of the United States. Fedenisn’s whistleblower case may be a problem for Hillary, since the alleged abuse occurred during Clinton’s time as secretary of state.

The real question is whether current Secretary of State John Kerry will support Fedenisn’s findings or cover them up. On one hand, Kerry has the perfect opportunity to clean house based on the information from the tenure of a previous secretary of state. He could use the data and remove individuals as well as institute new policies. On the other hand, as a good Democrat, Kerry could keep Hillary clean and help her presidential aspirations.

In the end, Fedenisn is a problem for Democrats. If her allegations are substantiated, she will be a true hero to Americans looking for a better America. If the Democrats, or the State Department, succeed in demonizing and undermining her, then expect Clinton's lies to remain hidden — until she can secure the 2016 nomination, at the very least.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Darcy Kempa

Darcy is an avid fan of politics and the political process. He worked for the Richard M. Daley mayoral campaign in late 1982 through early 1983. Darcy completed 21 years of military service in the Marine Corps and the Navy. While in the Navy, he served at the Pentagon and completed the Capital Hill Workshop from the Government Affairs Institute of Georgetown University. Darcy has a Masters of Arts in Organizational Management and a Masters Certificate in Project Management. He is also a Certified Manager which was obtained through the Institute of Certified Professional Managers.

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