Watch Eliot Spitzer Sputter About His "Motivations" For Hiring Prostitutes

Former New York Governor Eliot Spitzer (D) shows that he is still uncomfortable talking about dirty details of the sex scandal that forced him to resign. In an interview on "Charlie Rose" Tuesday night, the New York City comptroller candidate was questioned on his motivations for breaking the law when he solicited prostitutes on multiple occasions. Spitzer was also questioned on whether or not he believed the women he paid for sex were exploited.

In response to questions about his motivations for turning to prostitution, Spitzer, while tripping over his own words, answered, "I don't think I can shed light on what motivations — I mean, other than to acknowledge that we have within us all drives, urges which should be tempered, controlled, modulated, held in check, that I did not." And though Sptizer evaded the question on whether he believed the women he slept with were exploited, he did say "[Prostitution] is an exploitative industry, yes."

Both of these answers in this interview were contradictory. After evading the question about the exploitation of the women he slept with, admitting that the whole industry is exploitative means that Spitzer essentially answered the first question about the women he slept with. Spitzer said he could not "shed light on what motivations" drove him to prostitution but immediately followed that statement with the exact motivation: he was horny and could not control himself (but he said it in politician talk. I translated it. You're welcome.). And for someone who spent $80,000 on prostitutes, he had a lot of "drives" and "urges" that he could not keep in check.

Watch the video below for yourself and you will see how uncomfortable he is answering questions about the specifics of his sex scandal.

After tearing up on MSNBC's Morning Joe and this unconfident interview, even though voters might be ready to give him a second chance, maybe Spitzer is not as comfortable publicly confronting his scandal as he thought he was.