Egyptian Protests: America Bankrolled Morsi's Opponents and Is Way Too Involved

The U.S Embassy in Cairo reopened Monday morning as a senior White House official arrives for talks with Egyptian authorities.

This trip, which comes only two weeks after ex-president Mohammad Morsi’s ousting, seems to indicate that the US has broken all ties with its former Muslim Brotherhood ally.

U.S Deputy Secretary of State Bill Burns, is the Washington official meeting in Cairo today. USA Today reported that Burns will "hold meetings with Egypt’s interim government officials and civil society and business leaders" during his two-day trip. 

The State Department released a statement on Burns’ behalf, explaining America’s position. "[Burns’ trip will] underscore U.S support for the Egyptian people, and end to all violence, and a transition leading to an inclusive, democratically elected civilian government.

America’s all-out dismissal of the Morsi government may come as a shock considering their previous support for him. Even after the Islamist took power in 2012, the U.S continued giving Egypt billions of dollars in aid. 

Yet recent reports suggest that American officials had been plotting for Morsi's ousting by bankrolling anti-Morsi activists. AlJazeera published a lengthy expose last Wednesday and revealed that "dozens of US federal government documents show Washington has quietly funded senior Egyptian opposition figures who called for toppling of the country’s now deposed president Mohamed Morsi."

The State Department program – obtained by AlJazeera reporters through the Freedom of Information Act – was termed "democratic assistance" by Washington officials.

American taxpayers paid for the "democratic assistance." The tab exceeds hundreds of millions of dollars.

Let's hope the White House is not planning any more foreign revolutions behind our backs. They're pricey.

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Uchechi Kalu

Uchechi is PolicyMic's Politics Intern and a senior@ Princeton University. Tweet her @chechkalu

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