Mic Check: What Do Japan's Elections Mean For the World?

1. Japanese Voters End Six Years Of Government Gridlock
 
Japanese voters handed Prime Minster Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democrats a convincing victory on Sunday, ending six years of parliamentary gridlock. Liberal Democrats had won 76 of the 121 seats up for grabs in the upper house of parliament as of this morning, giving the party a majority in both chambers. The victory will make it easier for the prime minister to pass his economic reform legislation, known as “abenomics.” Liberal Democrats have also expressed interest in rewriting Japan’s constitution to allow for a full military. The New York Times says the win gives Abe “the chance to be the most transformative leader in a decade.”
 
More from around the web:
• Global markets had a surprising response to Japan’s election results (Reuters).
 
Did Abenomics kill K-pop? (Quartz)
 
More From PolicyMic:
Japan Is Rebuilding Its Coastline, So Why Are Environmentalists Upset? (Aubrey Bloomfield)
 
2. Israel and Palestine Reach Tentative Agreement to Resume Peace Talks
 
Secretary of State John Kerry announced Friday that Israel and Palestine have tentatively agreed to resume peace talks. The agreement has not been finalized, but Kerry says negotiators will hammer out the details in Washington. He said Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas could begin talks within a week. The talks would be the first direct negotiations between Israel and Palestine in three years.
 
More from around the web:
What exactly did Israel and Palestine agree to? (Washington Post)
 
• Get an inside look at Kerry’s Mideast team (NY Times).
 
More From PolicyMic:
Why Obama Is OK With Israeli Air Strikes On Syria (Roy Klabin)
 
3. India to Launch Massive New Food Program
 
The death of more than 20 children in India last week put the country’s school lunch program under scrutiny, but the tragedy also raises concerns about India’s new plan to feed the poor. The National Food Security Ordinance is an ambitious plan to reduce extreme poverty in India; the country came in at 65 on the 2012 Global Hunger Index. Under the plan, two-thirds of Indians (that’s 800 million people) will receive 11 pounds of grain a month at greatly reduced prices. It’s estimated the plan will cost India at least $20 billion a year.
 
More from around the web:
Can India afford $20 billion a year in public spending? (LiveMint)
 
• In case you missed it, what do India’s school lunch deaths mean for its new food program? (Quartz)
 
More From PolicyMic:
• The U.S. is dealing with a different kind of food problem: Mississippi Passes the Anti-Bloomberg Law, And It’s Pretty Similar to Bloomberg’s Soda Ban
(Matthew Rozsa)
 
4. Study Finds Daughters Make Men Generous
 
Three business professors have released a study that provides fascinating insight into why some wealthy men are more generous than others. The researchers tackled the question by looking at the salaries 10,000 male CEOs in Denmark paid their employees over 10 years. They found the executives reduced their workers’ pay after having a son, but not after having a daughter. The researchers concluded the executives felt pressure to take home a higher salary if they had a son, while taking care of a daughter made them more empathetic and giving.
 
More from around the web:
• Politicians with daughters vote more progressively than their peers (American Economic Review).
 
More From PolicyMic:
9 Politicians Who Voted For the Defense of Marriage Act But Cheated On Their Wives (Hannah Kapp-Klote)
 
Boys With Sisters Are More Likely to Be Republicans (Alex Uriarte)
 
5. Chris Froome wins 100th Tour de France
 
Cyclist Chris Froome became the second consecutive Brit to win the Tour de France on Sunday. The race featured a spectacular finish in honor of its 100th year: The final stage ended in Paris at the Champs-Elysée. Froome dominated the race, taking the lead at Stage 8 and never looking back. Before crossing the finish line, he sipped on a glass of champagne and locked arms with his teammates. Froome promised he won fair and square. “This is one yellow jersey that will stand the test of time,” he said
 
More from around the web:
100 years of Tour de France bikes (Gizmodo).
 
• The Tour wasn’t the only major sporting event over the weekend: Golfer Phil Mickelson played an incredible final round to win the British Open (Business Insider).
 
More From PolicyMic:
It’s About Time Women Had Their Own Tour De France (Anna Hogeland)
 
Dessert
Everything you know about the brain is wrong (Salon).
 
Check out this sleep-away camp for postmodern cowboys (NY Times).
 
Why I majored in philosophy even though everyone told me not to (PolicyMic).
 
There are more ways than ever to hack your phone (Forbes).
 
The 5 most incredible scenes preserved by fossils (Cracked).
 
Thanks for reading!
Nick
 
Don’t be a stranger; I love getting feedback. Find me on twitter @nicholascbaker.
 
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