Should Tay Allyn's "Mass Text" Video Have Gone Viral?

"Mass Text," a viral video depicting a Barbie prototype singing about a text message she didn’t receive from her high school crush, has received over 600,000 views on YouTube. If it wasn’t for the nearly 20,000 dislikes it has received, my faith in people’s intelligence would have decreased significantly.


The singer, Tay Allyn, is a recent graduate from the University of Southern California School of Theatre and Music, and is the commencement speaker for her class. The bio on her website opens:

“Hey, it’s [smiley face icon] Tay I joyfully embody the fun positive energy of being 23 and having your dreams come true.”

That’s sweet, Tay, but did you really have to make a video that is devoid of intelligible lyrics, creativity, and substance? I fail to see the positivity you wish to impart to the public. And I'm not alone. Zoe Mintz of the International Buisness Times composed a comparative analysis of Tay Allyn’s “Mass Text” and Rebecca Black's “Friday,” and found that “Mass Text” puts “Friday” to shame.

Both of these videos are insults to the progress of humanity. The University of Southern California should be embarrassed for molding such a regressive media icon. Tay’s website tagline promises, “Pop songs about your normal everyday life, to hot beats.”

Sorry, Tay. Your beats aren’t “hot,” and repeatedly singing, “Why didn’t I get your mass text? I’m in your contacts!” isn’t too hot either. How are these types of lyrics and videos capable of going viral? Moreover, why are producers and music companies allowing such absurdities to be distributed to the public?

It’s appalling that such vapid and senseless productions are valued in our society. Tay has chosen to represent the decline of humanity and the denigration of women’s value in our culture, not the positivity of life.

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Andreea Nica

Andreea Nica is a freelance writer, scholar, egalitarian, and yogi. She holds a master's degree from the London School of Economics within Communications. Andreea also holds a B.A. in Psychology from Northern Arizona University. Currently, she is writing a nonfiction narrative on transitioning from Pentecostalism, focusing on society, identity, and power. She is the Founder and Editor of OrganiCommunications empowering clients in content development and media strategy. She is the author of 2 blogs and writes for various online platforms. You can find her meandering in the Pacific Northwest. Contact Andreea: andreea@organicommunications.com

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