The One Chart That Completely Sums Up the Bradley Manning Trial

An "aiding the enemy" charge would have put Bradley Manning in prison for life, but alone, his guilty charges could add up to to 136 years in prison. Manning never stood a chance at regaining his freedom.

Andrea O'Brien, a blogger who attended every session of the Bradley Manning trial, tweeted the following chart. It includes every charge Manning faced, the federal laws he violated, his pleas, the maximum punishments, and the verdict. 


via Twitter

Of the 22 charges listed, Manning was acquitted of only two of them. He did plead guilty to a number of charges, drastically lowering his jail sentence. However, many analysts believe that the federal government used the high profile "aiding the enemy" charge to distract the mainstream media from the espionage accusations Manning faced. 

The Espionage Act is listed multiple times under the "federal violation" column. The 65th Congress passed it in 1917 soon after the United States entered WWI. But its use in this case, some say, is a part of the government's ploy to curb free speech and discourage modern-age whistleblowing. 

So even if Manning was not charged with "aiding the enemy," his ruling is still a message to all who seek to reveal the truth about our government. Because if they catch you, they've got you for life. 

Manning's sentencing hearing begins Wednesday morning. 

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Uchechi Kalu

Uchechi is PolicyMic's Politics Intern and a senior@ Princeton University. Tweet her @chechkalu

MORE FROM

'Hot Mic' podcast: GOP Senate health care, Comey tapes, 2016 election data stolen

The important stories to get you caught up for Friday

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.

'Hot Mic' podcast: GOP Senate health care, Comey tapes, 2016 election data stolen

The important stories to get you caught up for Friday

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Minneapolis might get a $15 minimum wage, but restaurant workers aren't celebrating

Discord has been brewing in Minneapolis over whether tipped work will be counted toward a $15 minimum wage.

These abysmal new poll numbers for House health care bill don't bode well for Senate version

Only 34% of Republicans approve of the new proposed law.