Avicii's New Album Mixes Country and Electronic Dance Music for First Time Ever

Renowned Swedish DJ and producer Tim Bergling — also know as "Avicii" — debuts his first studio album "True" (Island Records) on September 17.

Make no mistake, this one's going to be big; not just because it's his first album since entering the scene with "Levels" two years ago, but because it's hands down the most integrative, diverse album to date for the still-emerging mainstream Electric Dance Music (EDM) scene.

He put a lot of time and effort into this first album, amassing melodies from a plethora of artists from different genres — none of whom had ever worked with electronic artists before. This collaboration brings together unique influences from rock, soul, folk, R&B, bluegrass, old school house, and funk, yielding a fusion of styles and a multifarious incorporation that's long overdue.

Continued ridicule and antiestablishment activism from meticulous artists such as Diplo and deadmau5 have provoked a transformative dynamic — a revolutionary movement within the EDM community. Many artists, like Avicii, have widened their horizons to appeal to a broadening fan base and to also avoid a reputation for being stagnant or inept.

So far, we've seen incorporation of hip hop, reggae, and soul, blues, and R&B, but many have been awaiting probably the most difficult mix of all — country and electronic music.

Avicii rolled the dice in Miami last spring, premiering innovative new tracks to a disappointed, bro-filled crowd at Ultra Music Festival. Most fans assumed they'd be hearing his trademark progressive synths, tapestops, and pitch bends; they weren't expecting a live set with actual instruments and a banjo.

Avicii's "True" is uniquely defined by Motown, bluegrass and folk-esque melodies, encompassing sure hit progressive tracks ("Shame On Me"); indie-electronic vibes ("Liar Liar"); a radio-destined hit with Nile Rogers and Adam Lambart ("Lay Me Down"); and, last but not least, impressive collaborations with up-and-coming folk artist Audra Mae ("Dear Boy," "Long Road to Hell.")

"Wake Me Up" and "Hey Brother" succeed in achieving a fusion of country and electronic music for the first time ever — a huge step for the industry. These two genres have no business being together, but for some reason, it works.

Preview all 12 tracks on Avicii's "True" here:


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Logan Nee

Logan wrote for Mic from October 2011 to February 2014. He is now living in New York City. [logan.nee@gmail.com]

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