Whitey Bulger Guilty Of Murder and Racketeering, Sentenced to Life in Prison

Today, former Boston gangster and FBI informant Whitey Bulger was found guilty of murder, racketeering, and conspiracy after more than 30 hours of jury deliberation. Bulger has been charged with 32 counts including 19 murders, extortion, money laundering, and other crimes.

During his time as an FBI informant, Bulger's activities were highly questionable (to say the least) but ignored by the agency. Once the media discovered his criminal actions, his former FBI handler tipped him off to pending racketeering charges. Bulger went into hiding for 16 years until he was finally arrested on June 22, 2011. With most of his convictions carrying a maximum life sentence, there is no doubt that Bulger will spend the rest of his days in jail.

During his time as an organized crime figure, he had provided key information about the Patriarca crime family. When he was arrested at the home of his girlfriend, Cather Greig, a multitude of weapons were found in addition to $822,000 in cash and a Stanley cup ring. Bulger has agreed to forfeit the assets except for the ring, which was given to him by "an unnamed 'third party.'" Bulger pleaded with prosecutors to keep his ring, and his request was granted.

More than 70 witnesses took to the stand to testify against Bugler in the seven-week trial. Many were concerned that the length of the jury's deliberations would increase the chances of them finding Bulger not guilty. Yet according to Boston defense lawyer, Anthony Cardinale, "the length of time means nothing."

Bugler was only convicted of 11 of the 19 murder charges brought against him. The verdicts bring an end to one of the most controversial dealings of the FBI during the 1970s.

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Nicholas Demas

Former Editorial Intern at PolicyMic. I am a junior at Tufts University majoring in Economics with a minor in Entrepreneurial Leadership. I have a profound passion for the American political process and a love for my country.

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