4 Shocking Scenes From Egypt's Brutal Crackdown On Protesters

A month-long state of emergency was declared by Egypt's interim President Adly Mansour following a horrific, bloody government crackdown on pro-Morsi demonstrators on Wednesday, August 14. Among the dead are international journalists, including Sky News cameraman Mick Deane, and scores of Egyptian protesters including women and children. 

The degree of bloodshed remains unclear as journalists scramble to gain accurate reports on the violence, but at least 149 people have been reported dead so far, according to Egypt's Health Ministry. Some are reporting injuries to be in the thousands. The White House press secretary's office recently issued a statement condemning the violence.

But this morning's crackdown may just be the beginning. The newest images coming from Cairo indicate that the violence is raging on. The latest footage depicts violent clashes between protesters and security forces, including shocking images of mobs pushing an armored police van off Cairo's "6th of October bridge," indicating the situation may be moving from bad to worse (videos and photos below).

1. Mobs push armored police van off of Cairo's "6th October" Bridge





2. Cairo's streets in the Giza district erupt in flames




3. Security forces move in, joined by military




4. A Euronews correspondent braves the situation to move among the protesters

How much do you trust the information in this article?

Rachel George

Rachel is a PhD candidate in International Relations at the London School of Economics. She holds a BA in Politics from Princeton and an MA in Middle Eastern Studies from Harvard. Her interests include journalism, U.S. foreign policy, human rights, and international law.

MORE FROM

Man with Nazi tattoos at Cleveland Indians game sparks outrage. The Indians’ mascot is still racist.

Swastikas are bad. So is Chief Wahoo.

Baton Rouge police chief resigns after a year of political turmoil over Alton Sterling shooting

Baton Rouge's mayor had campaigned on a promise to replace the city's police chief, in the wake of Alton Sterling's shooting death.

‘Whose Streets?’ film highlights Ferguson activists’ battle with the trauma of protests

Brittany Ferrell, an organizer of the Ferguson Uprising, says a new documentary about Black Lives Matter protests shows why activists should be more intentional about checking in on each other.

Minneapolis police chief resigns after fatal shooting of Australian woman

Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau announced in a Facebook post that she is stepping aside.

Mentally ill prisoners in Louisiana forced to bark like dogs for food, lawsuit claims

Investigators came. Everyone was told not to speak to them.

Philando Castile’s mother supports Justine Damond’s family at march in Minneapolis

"We're just here to support the family," she said. "That's all."

Man with Nazi tattoos at Cleveland Indians game sparks outrage. The Indians’ mascot is still racist.

Swastikas are bad. So is Chief Wahoo.

Baton Rouge police chief resigns after a year of political turmoil over Alton Sterling shooting

Baton Rouge's mayor had campaigned on a promise to replace the city's police chief, in the wake of Alton Sterling's shooting death.

‘Whose Streets?’ film highlights Ferguson activists’ battle with the trauma of protests

Brittany Ferrell, an organizer of the Ferguson Uprising, says a new documentary about Black Lives Matter protests shows why activists should be more intentional about checking in on each other.

Minneapolis police chief resigns after fatal shooting of Australian woman

Minneapolis Police Chief Janeé Harteau announced in a Facebook post that she is stepping aside.

Mentally ill prisoners in Louisiana forced to bark like dogs for food, lawsuit claims

Investigators came. Everyone was told not to speak to them.

Philando Castile’s mother supports Justine Damond’s family at march in Minneapolis

"We're just here to support the family," she said. "That's all."