Mic Check: How Egypt’s Violence Will Rock the World For Years to Come

1. Egypt Spirals Out Of Control
 
The violence that has plagued Egypt since the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi on July 3 has finally spiraled out of control. Clashes broke out across Egypt on Wednesday when police tried to break up two protests in support of Morsi. The Healthy Ministry says at least 525 were killed in the violence, and 3,717 were injured. The interim government declared a month-long state of emergency, a tool Egyptian rulers have frequently used to crack down on perceived threats. Cairo was quiet Thursday morning, but Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood party has called for protests later today.
 
Writing for the New Yorker, Columbia Journalism School Dean Steve Coll says the violence marks an end to free elections in Egypt. He predicts Egypt’s turbulence will cause years of domestic terrorism and a new era of anti-Islamist politics in the Arab world. The New York Times reports on the broader struggles of Arab Spring countries: From Libya to Tunisia, the transition to democracy has not been easy.
 
More from around the web:
Egypt’s government thugs beat me up at the Rabaa sit-in (Daily Beast).
 
A timeline of key events in Egypt’s unrest (AP).
 
• Egyptian photographer Mosa’ab Elshamy snapped incredible photos of yesterday’s violence (BuzzFeed).
 
More from PolicyMic:
• Egypt’s Shameful Response to Peaceful Assembly (Bryant Harris)
 
 
2. FBI Reveal Charges Against former JPMorgan Traders
 
Two former JPMorgan traders were criminally charged on Wednesday for manipulating the books. The traders made dangerous bets on the future value of assets, and are accused of hiding losses when the trades went south. Surprisingly, officials did not file charges against the trader infamously known as the “London Whale” for his role in the trades; he struck a deal to provide information on the bets. JPMorgan reported a loss of at least $6 billion from the bad trades.
 
More from around the web:
Why Wall Street’s biggest fish always get away (Atlantic).
 
More from PolicyMic:
• "Too Big To Jail" Will Cause America to Fail (Ben Fogel)
 
 
3. Cory Booker Takes Another Step Towards the Senate
 
Newark Mayor Cory Booker easily won the Democratic primary in the New Jersey Senate race this week, netting 60% of the vote. His closest rival only got 20%. Booker will now face off against former Bogota Mayor Steve Lonegan on Oct. 16, with the winner completing the remaining 15 months in the term of the late Senator Frank Lautenberg. Booker is expected to win easily. The Washington Post predicts Booker could become the highest-profile Democrat in the Senate.
 
More from around the web:
How twitter can help predict an election (WaPo).
 
Cory Booker isn’t just a politician – he’s also a Silicon Valley insider (NY Times).
 
More from PolicyMic:
• Cory Booker Doesn’t Need the Senate – the Senate Needs Cory Booker (Aakash Shah)
 
 
4. Pentagon Extends Benefits to Same-Sex Spouses
 
The Pentagon announced on Wednesday that it will extend benefits to the same-sex spouses of military members no later than Sep. 3. Troops and their spouses will be able to apply for retroactive health and house benefits, as long as they provide a valid marriage certificate. The military will even allow gay couples to travel to another state to get married if they are stationed in an area that doesn’t allow gay marriage. The change is part of the fallout from the Supreme Court decision striking down the Defense of Marriage Act.
 
More from around the web:
What the end of DOMA means for the gay rights movement (New Yorker).
 
What are the financial consequences of the DOMA decision? (WaPo)
 
More from PolicyMic:
7 States That May Never Legalize Gay Marriage (T. Chase Meacham)
 
 
5. What Made the New York Times Go Dark?
 
Subscribers to the New York Times were left scratching their heads when the paper’s website went offline for about two hours on Wednesday, starting around 11 a.m. The Times issued a statement saying the error was the result of a “scheduled maintenance update,” and at least one IT pro agrees. But not everyone buys that explanation: “It’s a good spin to blame this on a crappy update or bad management, but I’m leaning toward the fact that they’re under [cyber]attack again,” a cybersecurity expert said.
 
More from around the web:
• In other high-tech news, Google said Gmail users shouldn’t expect their emails to stay private. But that’s not as scary as it sounds. (Business Insider, Verge)
 
More from PolicyMic:
How ‘New York Times’ Reporters Tweeted Their Way Through the Blackout (Rachel George)
 
 
DESSERT
Read about the winningest jockey of all time (NY Times).
 
• The true-life story of a baby born early to dodge taxes (Wonkblog).
 
• The not-so-crazy plan to build an ice wall around Fukushima (Quartz).
 
• Learn about the science of remembering your dreams (PopSci).
 
36 life hacks every college student should know (BuzzFeed).
 
 
Thanks for reading!
Nick
 
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