Calls Mounting for Newt Gingrich to Drop Out and Support Rick Santorum

Newt Gingrich had high hopes for winning the Republican presidential nomination at the beginning of the Republican primaries, with the second highest support in CNN’s polls and a victory in South Carolina on January 21. But, two months later, he is ranked last in CNN’s most recent poll, and the majority say he should drop out of the race. Gingrich needs almost double the amount of delegates Mitt Romney needs to reach the required 1,144 to receive the nomination.

There have been multiple calls for Gingrich to accept his defeat and for his supporters to back Santorum to defeat Romney.

John Brabender, Rick Santorum’s top campaign strategist recently said: “It’s time for Gingrich supporters to get behind us if they truly want to have a conservative candidate; it’s up to Newt Gingrich to decide what his future is.”

60% of Republicans recently polled by CNN (March 24-25) said Gingrich should drop out. 61% said Ron Paul should drop out.

Conversely, 77% of those polled supported Mitt Romney remaining in the race. 59% thought Rick Santorum should continue as well.

Gingrich has been facing difficult times on the campaign trail financially as well. His campaign has suffered the most outstanding debt for any GOP candidate, topping off at $1.5 million.

Gingrich’s presidential campaign has made some recent adjustments to cut costs. One-third of its full-time staff has been cut and travel to the remaining primary states has been reduced. The campaign will focus its efforts to gain support through the Internet, videos, and social media.

Gingrich and his staff still remain confident that he will be able to hold on until the Republican National Convention, set to take place in Tampa, Fl. on August 27.

The earliest Newt Gingrich has said he will withdraw his campaign is June 26 – the last day of the primaries. There is only one event that could make him drop out, if Mitt Romney or Rick Santorum has received the 1,144 delegates.

This number is so important to Gingrich because it will assure that the candidate who has received at least this amount will be nominated as the Republican presidential candidate in Tampa.

If none of the candidates running in the primaries receives this minimum, it will be an open running game at the Republican National Convention. Gingrich would then hope to double his efforts in August to win over the delegates at the convention.

With decreasing support and increasing debt, it is highly unlikely that Newt Gingrich would win at the Republican National Convention even if Romney or Santorum does not clinch the nomination in the primaries. Regardless, it appears that Gingrich revels too much in life on the campaign trail and the accompanying attention to fold just yet.