The 3 Most Hypocritical Things About the U.S. Going to War With Syria

Whether or not you support the U.S. decision to go to war with Syria, there is no denying the blatant hypocrisy in the justification that the U.S. should intervene because of Bashar al-Assad’s alleged use of chemical weapons.

Here are three of the biggest hypocrisies:

1. The U.S. supported one of the worst chemical warfare attacks in history.

In a bombshell, though under-reported, story from last week, Foreign Policy revealed CIA files that prove the United States helped Saddam Hussein as he was launching some of the worst chemical attacks in human history against Iran in 1988. The files show that the U.S. knew about — and did nothing to stop — a series of nerve gas attacks far more devastating than anything Syria has experienced to date. The U.S. continued to provide Iraq with military and intelligence aid, despite knowing that Hussein was using the same chemical weapon — sarin gas — that Assad is allegedly using today. 

2. The U.S. used chemical weapons during the 2003 Iraq war.

During the Gulf War, the U.S. classified white phosphorus as a “chemical” weapon when Saddam Hussein was using it against the Kurds. Yet, fast-forward to the 2003 Iraq War and the U.S. identified white phosphorus as a “conventional” weapon to justify their use of it in Fallujah. The use of white phosphorus and depleted uranium during the Iraq War has led to a rise in birth defects and cancer rates in the country, even ten years after the start of the war.

3. The U.S. allowed companies to manufacture and export components used to make the same chemical weapon that Assad allegedly used in Syria.

I have previously written about the horrendous U.S. policy that allows companies to continue to manufacture and export chemicals after they have been banned for domestic use. So it comes as no surprise that in 1992 when a cargo jet bound for Israel from the U.S. crashed in the Netherlands, a component of the nerve gas sarin was found aboard the plane. More recently, Britain allowed a company to export nerve gas chemicals to Syria, 10 months after the Syrian uprising began. British Prime Minister David Cameron tweeted that he understands and supports Barack Obama's position on Syria. So even though Britain sold nerve gas chemicals to Syria, Cameron is apparently shocked that Assad may have actually used them.

If the U.S. wants to continue the state of perpetual war that the military industrial complex depends on, just admit it. Let’s stop pretending that we’re going to war with Syria because Assad allegedly used chemical weapons.

How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

Evan Mascagni

Director & Producer, Toxic Profits (www.toxicprofitsfilm.com). Partner, Zero Bound (www.zerobound.com). Attorney, California Anti-SLAPP Project (www.casp.net). Legislative Assistant, Public Participation Project (www.anti-SLAPP.org).

MORE FROM

Johnny Depp jokes about assassinating Donald Trump

"It's been a while," Depp said, "and maybe it's time."

Trump says he finds special counsel Mueller's relationship with James Comey "bothersome"

Trump says "virtually everybody agrees" that there's been no collusion or obstruction of justice.

'Hot Mic' podcast: GOP Senate health care, Comey tapes, 2016 election data stolen

The important stories to get you caught up for Friday

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.

Johnny Depp jokes about assassinating Donald Trump

"It's been a while," Depp said, "and maybe it's time."

Trump says he finds special counsel Mueller's relationship with James Comey "bothersome"

Trump says "virtually everybody agrees" that there's been no collusion or obstruction of justice.

'Hot Mic' podcast: GOP Senate health care, Comey tapes, 2016 election data stolen

The important stories to get you caught up for Friday

Watchdog groups sue Trump for deleting tweets, allegedly violating Presidential Records Act

Trump's deleted tweets may come back to haunt him.

Grizzly bear protections in Yellowstone National park are ending

A final ruling by US government officials will strike the Yellowstone grizzly bear from the list of threatened species after its population increased to 700.

Another day, another off-camera White House press briefing

The move to scale back on-camera press briefings comes amid Trump's increasing unwillingness to interact with the press.