Wisconsin Recall Results: Scott Walker Would be Only the Third Sitting Governor to Be Recalled in U.S. History

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who led a highly polarized campaign in 2011 to limit the power of public employee unions and bringing the ire of labor groups across the country, will face a recall election later on June 5, the state's Government Accountability Board ruled Friday.

According to PolicyMic pundit Christine Harbin, there are a number of Walker ads — both for and against the Walker recall — currently circulating through the state. These ads were sprinkled in with Republican primary ads and robocalls for a number of weeks leading up to Tuesday’s vote, which Mitt Romney easily won.

Harbin responds to the upcoming Walker recalls:

“My thoughts are that the recall should not be happening and is a waste of taxpayer’s money. The purpose of a recall should be for clear wrongdoing by an elected official. This is not about that at all.

“If an elected official abuses power, he or she should be recalled. If an elected official supports legislation which you oppose however, there is nothing inherently wrong with that. If an elected official supports legislation which you oppose, you should focus on the legislation and not the individual.

“Work through due process to modify or change the legislation, but do not recall the elected official. Even if I were opposed to the recently passed legislation, I would still not support the recall effort.”

Two Republicans are the focus of the recall, Walker and Lt. Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch. The board certified that there were 900,938 valid signatures to recall Walker and 808,990 valid signatures to recall Kleefisch. Officials said 540,208 signatures were required for the recall vote to be ordered.

If Walker fails the vote, he would be only the third sitting governor in U.S. history to be recalled. Voters decided to dump California Gov. Gray Davis in 2003 and North Dakota Gov. Lynn Frazier in 1921.

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Chris Miles

Chris has worked for media outlets including the Associated Press and Stars and Stripes. He worked with the Clinton Foundation, the United Nations, and with the Kentucky state legislature. He holds a master's degree in political science from the University of Louisville, and a BA in journalism and political science from the University of Kentucky. He is originally from Lexington, Ky. Kentucky basketball occupies a majority of his free time.

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