Mic Check: 8 Reasons This Week’s UN Meeting is a BFD

1. How the UN General Assembly Could Change the World
 
The UN General Assembly kicks off today in New York, and this year’s meeting could have a huge impact on the world. Global superpowers are meeting today to discuss a resolution that would force Bashar al-Assad to give up his chemical weapons; the key here is whether or not Russia will throw its support behind the effort. The General Assembly could also lead to a breakthrough on Iran’s nuclear program. Secretary of State John Kerry is meeting with Iran’s foreign minister on Thursday, and it’s even possible Obama will run into Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. Don’t be surprised if some UN members take this chance to give the U.S. a slap on the wrist over NSA spying.
 
8 reasons this week’s UN meeting is a BFD (WaPo).
 
• Why Hasan Rouhani’s UN speech could be a gamechanger for Jews in Iran (PolicyMic).
 
 
2. What Kenya’s Terrorist Attack Was Really About
 
It’s unclear how close Kenya’s military is to fighting off Al-Shabab terrorists as the siege of Nairobi’s Westgate Mall enters its fourth day. The Kenyan military on Monday tweeted it had taken control of the mall, and reports came out all hostages had been freed. However, Al-Shabab sent out a different message on Twitter. They claim there are still gunmen with hostages in the building. The attack on the Westgate Mall could be the first move in an upswing of activity from Al-Shabab. A foreign policy expert says the Kenya attack is a sign Al-Shabab is growing desperate.
 
10 things you should know about Al-Shabab (WaPo).
 
Why U.S. retaliation for the terror attack in Kenya would be a huge mistake (PolicyMic).
 
 
3. Egypt May Have Banned the Muslim Brotherhood, But It Will Be Lost Without It
 
Egypt’s interim government made its boldest move yet against the Muslim Brotherhood on Monday when a court banned all party activities. The military-backed government has repeatedly cracked down on the Brotherhood following the uprising in July that removed former President Mohamed Morsi from office; police have arrested many high-profile Brotherhood members, including the party’s spiritual leader and its English-language spokesman. The shutdown of the Muslim Brotherhood could hurt millions of Egyptians who use the party’s social services: Muslim Brotherhood hospitals treated more than one million cases in 2011.
 
• A doctor secretly recorded Egypt’s former dictator. Find out what he had to say about his allies in the U.S. (NY Times).
 
Why the ban of the Muslim Brotherhood could mean more violence for Egypt (PolicyMic).
 
 
4. The Haters Say Apple is Done – 9 Million iPhones Say Otherwise
 
So what if Apple isn’t as innovative as it used to be? The company proved the haters wrong by selling nine million models of the iPhone 5S and 5C over the weekend; that’s almost double the number of phones they sold when the iPhone 5 first came out. Apple stock shot up 5% on Monday in response to the sales. Meanwhile, BlackBerry continued its slide into smartphone oblivion by agreeing to sell for $4.7 billion. At $9 a share, that’s 6% of Blackberry’s peak value. There’s good news coming for smartphone users everywhere: It looks like the FAA is going to let you keep your phone on during takeoff.
 
• Your iPhone 5S isn’t as safe as you thought: techies have already hacked the fingerprint sensor (BuzzFeed).
 
5 things you need to know about the Blackberry sale (PolicyMic).
 
 
DESSERT
3,000 years of human history described in one set of equations (Smithsonian).
 
Dante de Blasio and the 10 greatest afros of all time (PolicyMic).
 
• This 77-year-old had a $100,000 salary, and now he’s spending his retirement flipping burgers (Bloomberg).
 
• For fans of Breaking Bad: the connection between meth labs and property value (BI).
 
6 castles that cost less than an NYC apartment (BuzzFeed).
 
 
Thanks for reading!
Nick
 
What do you think about the topics in today’s Mic Check? Share your thoughts with me on Twitter @nicholascbaker.
 
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