Is Your State Missing Out On Major Online Gambling Money? Check This Graph to Find Out

The American Gaming Association estimates that Americans spend about $4 billion gambling online each year, even though Congress banned it in the U.S. in 2006. About 1,700 offshore sites have handled these bets, but there are now three states benefiting from superseding the federal laws that have tried to keep players from cashing in big.  

Delaware, Nevada, and New Jersey have all been dealt a royal straight flush on the river and now allow online gambling. California, Massachusetts, Iowa, and Illinois hope to follow suit and allow it in the near future, too.

Considering that the online gambling industry is one of the most profitable industries on the internet, millions of people around the world are wagering on sports and playing poker. Not only do online gaming sites offer convenience and safety to users who choose to use them, but they also provide economic benefits to governments at the state and federal levels.

In regards to money, jobs, and government influence, the online gambling industry is a major force in the U.S. Whether it’s legal or illegal, it’ll always be a discussed and debated. The following infographic briefly examines online gambling and the financial impacts that accompany it.


Infographic by DJ Miller

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