This Map Shows the 29 States Where You Can Be Legally Fired For Being Gay


Despite recent advances in LGBT rights such as the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell and Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), there is still a long way to go until gay, lesbian, and transgender Americans achieve full equality in the United States.

Especially when it comes to employment.

Between 15% and 43% of LGBT Americans have experienced discrimination or harassment in the workplace as a result of their sexual orientation. Even more staggering is the proportion of transgender individuals who have had such experiences: 90%. 

More shocking, there are still 29 states where LGBT Americans can be legally fired from their jobs based solely on their sexual orientation. These states are:

Alabama

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

Florida

Georgia

Idaho

Indiana

Kansas

Kentucky

Louisiana

Michigan

Mississippi

Missouri

Montana

Nebraska

North Carolina

North Dakota

Ohio

Oklahoma

Pennsylvania

South Carolina

South Dakota

Tennessee

Texas

Utah

Virginia

West Virginia

Wyoming

But there are good guys is this fight. Twenty-one states prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation, while 17 of these also protect against discrimination based on gender identity. These states are (with the years they enacted their laws and policies):

California (1992, 2003)

Colorado (2007)

Connecticut (1991, 2011)

Delaware (2009, 2013)

District of Columbia (1977, 2006)

Hawaii (2011), Illinois (2006)

Iowa (2007)

Massachusetts (1989, 2012)

Maine (2005)

Minnesota (1993)

New Jersey (1992, 2007)

New Mexico (2003)

Nevada (1999, 2011)

Oregon (2008)

Rhode Island (1995, 2001)

Vermont (1991, 2007)

Washington (2006)

States that only protect against discrimination based on sexual orientation, not gender identity (these states are purple in the map below):

Maryland (2001) 

New Hampshire (1998)

New York (2003)

Wisconsin (1982)



Via Upworthy

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