Antonin Scalia Actually Proven to Be the Funniest Supreme Court Justice

When it comes to bringing laughter to work every day, no one on the nation's highest court does it better than Justice Antonin Scalia — at least according to a recent study.

Justice Scalia is often known for the body blows he throws in his opinions on the court, but few outside the doors know how humorous the judge is inside the courtroom. The highest court in the land heard 343 instances of laughter., 136 of them from the court's left-wing and 136 from just Justice Scalia himself. The right dominates the comedic aspect of the court despite having the silent Justice Clarence Thomas and the statically least- funny Chief Justice John Roberts (Wwho could be funny when they've sentenced the American people to looking at this image for the rest of our lives?) Justice Scalia uses the wit he showcases in opinions and good-natured shots at his friends on the court to get the laughs he seeks.

According to the study, Justice Scalia has made Justice Stephen Breyer the butt of his jokes 11 times, more than anyone else on the court, and enjoys self-deprecating humor as well. In a case earlier this year, when faced with Justice Department attorney Sarah E. Harrington stating "It's not a source of economic value in the sort of traditional sense," Scalia countered, "A lot of people marry for money" in a deadpan style, eliciting laughter from the courtroom. The justice known affectionately as "Nino" also says he loves the movie My Cousin VinnyAnyone who loves My Cousin Vinny knows comedy. Justice Scalia must have the chops as a comedian because you don't get this many people saying how funny you are on both sides of the aisle without having the skills to back it up.

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Mike Mulraney

Media Coordinator in New York State. University of Scranton '12. Former campaign advisor. Social media veteran of federal campaigns. Two-time College Republican President, Founding Member Young Americans for Liberty - University of Scranton Chapter, Former Op-Ed writer for The Aquinas and Save Jersey, former host of The Spectrum on 99.5 WUSR FM.

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