2 Killers Released with Forged Documents

On Thursday, the Florida State Attorney's Office released a statement revealing that two convicted Orlando area killers were mistakenly released from prison. The office had only become aware of the issue after being contacted by the family of one of the victims.

Charles Walker and Joseph Jenkins, both 34, were released after forged "motion to correct illegal sentence" documents were accepted by the Orange County Clerk of Courts Office.

Jenkins was released Sept. 27 after his motion was accepted in August. After reviewing his case file, State Attorney Jeff Ashton found evidence of previous release attempts using forged documents.

Walker's paperwork was filed Oct. 7 and she was released the very next day. Documents for Walker and Jenkins included the bogus signatures of State Attorney Jim Altman and Circuit Court Judge Belvin Perry. The signatures were lifted from public court documents. The motions of both were made to look as though they were filed by the state in order to reduce the sentences. Judge Perry stated, "In my 35 years in the judicial system, I have never seen the state of Florida file a motion to correct an illegal sentence."

Ashton has directed his prosecuting team to review all case records for similar dubious court activity. The person who created and submitted the bogus paperwork is not yet known.

Joseph Jenkins was serving a life sentence after being charged with first-degree murder in the 1998 death of Roscoe Pugh, a father of six whom Jenkins killed in front of Pugh's children during a home invasion. Pugh's family alerted the State Attorney.

Charles Walker was convicted of second-degree murder in the death of Cedric Slater in 1999. Both men have extensive records of violent, drug-related crimes. The Orange County Sheriff's Office does not believe the men are together, but suspects both to be in the Orlando area.

Watch more on this story:


How likely are you to make Mic your go-to news source?

MORE FROM

Democrats on Neil Gorsuch's first Supreme Court term: "We've got another Scalia"

Some say Gorsuch's even-handed performance during his confirmation hearings "might be more an act than it was a real persona."

Fox News just hired US Rep. Jason Chaffetz as a correspondent

Chaffetz is headed to Fox.

Here are the key rulings from the Supreme Court's busy June term

The court's term ended with rulings on immigration, the First Amendment, LGBTQ rights and more.

These 3 Republican governors could pose the biggest threat to the Senate health care bill

Why some Republican governors oppose their own party's health care bill

When it comes to upholding the Paris climate agreement, America's mayors are leading the way

In spite of an uncooperative U.S. government, mayors around the world are working together to set the agenda on climate change.

The fatal Hillsborough Stadium Disaster is back in the news 30 years later. Here's why.

What was the Hillsborough Stadium disaster?

Democrats on Neil Gorsuch's first Supreme Court term: "We've got another Scalia"

Some say Gorsuch's even-handed performance during his confirmation hearings "might be more an act than it was a real persona."

Fox News just hired US Rep. Jason Chaffetz as a correspondent

Chaffetz is headed to Fox.

Here are the key rulings from the Supreme Court's busy June term

The court's term ended with rulings on immigration, the First Amendment, LGBTQ rights and more.

These 3 Republican governors could pose the biggest threat to the Senate health care bill

Why some Republican governors oppose their own party's health care bill

When it comes to upholding the Paris climate agreement, America's mayors are leading the way

In spite of an uncooperative U.S. government, mayors around the world are working together to set the agenda on climate change.

The fatal Hillsborough Stadium Disaster is back in the news 30 years later. Here's why.

What was the Hillsborough Stadium disaster?