CeCe McDonald Celebrates Her First Minutes of Freedom By Jamming Out To Beyoncé

CeCe McDonald Celebrates Her First Minutes of Freedom By Jamming Out To Beyoncé

CeCe McDonald was released from prison on Monday, over a year prior to her expected release date. Transgender actress and activist Laverne Cox was there to meet CeCe upon her release.

Cox is currently working on a documentary about CeCe's journey from that fateful night outside a Minneapolis bar on June 5, 2011, to her experience in men's prison where she had to fight for hormone treatments, much like Cox's experience on Orange Is The New Black. 


Source: Facebook

It all began one night in 2011, when CeCe was confronted by strangers Dean Schmitz and Molly Flaherty outside Schooner Tavern. They yelled racist and transphobic slurs as she and her friends passed. The confrontation turned violent when Flaherty smashed a glass on CeCe's face. CeCe pulled out a pair of scissors to defend herself, ending in the fatal stabbing of Schmitz. 

In 2012, CeCe accepted a plea deal for a reduced charge, pleading guilty to second-degree manslaughter rather than murder for Schmitz's death. Her story has received international attention and support in recent years, and it has come to a positive conclusion as she is finally released from prison.


Source: Facebook

As CeCe celebrates her release by jamming to Beyonce's visual album with Cox, she is planning to spend her first free days out with people she feels close to, according to her support committee. 

While we wait for CeCe to speak openly about her experience, here's how she's being welcomed back by supporters all over the world:



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Victoria Kim

Drug policy junkie. Truth seeker. Lover of food.

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