Republican Mitt Romney Didn't Fire Foreign Policy Advisor Richard Grenell for Being Gay

This week, the media, including a front-page story by the New York Times, focused on the story of Richard Grenell, one of the top foreign policy communicators in the country. It was reported that Grenell was fired from the Romney campaign under pressure from conservative groups. 

This is just false. He was never actually on the campaign payroll, he resigned, and the campaign's problems with him had to do with professionalism, not his sexuality.

There is actually very little data that this had anything to do with Grenell being gay. In fact, he was never even on the Romney payroll. When his role was announced, he deleted over 700 tweets. As someone who has had his own misadventures with Twitter, that's just not how one should act.

It seems clear that the Romney campaign was blindsided by the unprofessional behavior of one of the top foreign policy communicators in the business. When Grenell realized that he didn't have the faith of the campaign, demonstrated by not being put on calls with the reporters, Grenell saw the writing on the wall. 

Yes, some conservatives expressed concern that Grenell was gay. But was it a loud roar? No. Kevin Williamson, a conservative by any measure, mocked those concerns at the National Review. Instead what happened was that Grenell tried to change the topic and attack the Romney campaign. 

Perhaps they demonstrated poor vetting, but it is clear that they did not throw Grenell under the bus. He spun up some allied pundits, whether they are ideologically sympathetic on the right or gay media on the left eager to attack Republicans. 

A bunch of angry pundits attacked the Romney campaign for something that didn't happen. And the media bought this attack on Republicans hook, line, and sinker without any evidence. Just another day in Washington: venal infighting, CYA, and a pliable media.

 

This week, the media, including a front page story by the New York Times, focused on the story of Richard Grenell, one of the top foreign policy communicators in the country. It was reported that Grenell was fired from the Romney campaign under pressure from conservative groups. This is just false. He was never actually on the campaign payroll, he resigned, and the campaign's problems with him had to do with professionalism, not his sexuality.There is actually very little data that this had anything to do with Grenell being gay. In fact, he was never even on the Romney payroll. When his role was announced, he deleted over 700 tweets. As someone who has had his own misadventures with Twitter, that's just not how one should act.It seems clear that the Romney campaign was blindsided by the unprofessional behavior of one of the top foreign policy communicators in the business.When Grenell realized that he didn't have the faith of the campaign, demonstrated by not being put on calls with the reporters, Grenell saw the writing on the wall.Yes, some conservatives expressed concern that Grenell was gay. But was it a loud roar? No. Kevin Williamson, a conservative by any measure, mocked those concerns at the National Review.Instead what happened was that Grenell tried to change the topic and attack the Romney campaign. Perhaps they demonstrated poor vetting, but it is clear that they did not throw Grenell under the bus.He spun up some allied pundits, whether they be ideologically sympathetic on the right or gay media on the left eager to attack Republicans. A bunch of angry pundits attacked the Romney campaign for something that didn't happen.And the media bought this attack on Republicans hook, line, and sinker without any evidence.Just another day in Washington: venal infighting, CYA, and a pliable media.


 

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Soren Dayton

Soren Dayton works at Prism Public Affairs, public affairs shop in Washington, DC. Previously, Soren workedon John McCain‘s presidential campaign, where he worked on the delegate team, in addition to pinch-hitting on a number of communication functions. Prior to the McCain campaign, Soren worked as a political and strategy consultant for a variety of domestic and international clients. He has also worked on Capitol Hill, campaigns, and for a software company that he helped start. Soren graduated with a BA in Anthropology and Math from the University of Chicago. Soren is active in a number of young professional political organizations. He serves as the Executive Director of the Young Republican National Federation and a Board Member of the International Young Democrat Union. He writes regularly at Redstate.com and other sites. His writings have appeared in Roll Call, Politico, and other outlets. And he has appeared on CNN, BBC, RT, Al Jazeera, and among others. Soren is also an active lay leader in his church, Calvary Baptist in Washington, DC. Currently he serves as the Church Moderator, the leading lay position in the church, and has previously served as the Chairman of the Missions Board. A number of issues drive Soren’s interest in politics. At the top of the list are spreading economic and political freedom, starting with fighting corruption — a big deal having grown up in Chicago! — and encouraging commerce, trade, the positive impacts of globalization, etc. Soren believes deeply in the power of capitalism to help people raise their standard of living and fulfill their dreams. Soren lives in Northern Virginia with his wife Amanda Butler and their cat August.

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