North Carolina Amendment One: 3 State Voters React

Editor's note: Earlier this week, North Carolina voters passed Amendment One, which institutes a statewide constitutional ban on same-sex marriage for gay couples. We asked these three North Carolina residents to share their reactions to the amendment.

Michael Cain (Fayetville, NC): “Shame on you North Carolina. The marriage amendment passed in North Carolina by a wide margin, which isn't so much surprising as it is embarrassing. It begs the question. "Just what the hell are you afraid of?" Gay people are not going to invade your homes and steal your children, they're not going to take over your churches and use them to debauch and defame. Near as I can tell, gay people are very much like the rest of us. They want to be loved and they want to be accepted in society.

The primary support for this stupid amendment comes, ironically, from churches where they're supposed to provide guidance and support for living a life that God would approve of. If you believe that life on this planet happened because of the efforts of a loving God, how could you possibly behave so badly toward people that God created? Could you face Him and say, "Yes sir, we sure showed them queers didn't we?"

Would you expect God to give an attaboy for expressing such hatred? Shame on you.”

Marty Hyman (Apex, NC): “I spent the better part of Tuesday [election night] handing out pamphlets about why North Carolinians should not restrict the rights of any people who love each other. While my mother helped people cast their votes inside the Baptist church, my father and I competed in the parking lot - congenially, for the most part - with Republicans to inform voters about how Amendment One would not only prevent homosexual marriage, but heterosexual civil unions and unmarried domestic partnerships.

The poor wording of the amendment could prevent civil unions such as the ones which unified my parents, who are of different faiths. The amendment could rob straight men like me of the ability to rely on their parents' insurance plans. The economic consequences might even drive away businesses which formerly considered North Carolina a hub of technical innovation.

Most importantly, however, it marks my state as a backwater which considers the civil rights of friends and acquaintances nothing more than political cannon fodder.”

Adam Jutha (Chapel Hill, NC): “I'm not a U.S. citizen and I wasn't able to vote in today's North Carolina primary, but I have watched the arguments for and against Amendment One take over discussions and conversations across the campus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Energy has been running high since weeks before on-campus early voting last week, and momentum has only ramped up in recent days.

Although polling numbers and the Associated Press project the Amendment is slated to pass by a 60/40 margin, there has been an outpouring of support against the Amendment from a majority of Millennials.

Orange County, home to UNC Chapel Hill, took a strong stand (79%) against the Amendment. However, this stretches to concentrated spots across the state. Countless students have expressed their disbelief in the passing of the Amendment, with many taking to Facebook and Twitter to make known their "embarrassment calling North Carolina home" among friends and peers. But students are not letting go of the fight and plan to use this "backwards moment in history" to further propel their efforts in the months ahead.

Needless to say, the work of the anti-Amendment camp appears to be anywhere but over as they continue their fight for anti-discrimination, equality of civil rights and fairness.”

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The editorial board is based in New York City and represents the editorial voice of PolicyMic.

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