Humanitarians Of Tinder — The Weirdest Dating Profiles You'll See

Humanitarians Of Tinder — The Weirdest Dating Profiles You'll See

Quick. You have about 5 seconds to make a stranger think you're hot. Obviously you're going to want to strike a pose that shows off your attractive side, but that also compliments your looks by showing you care about more than just the mundane, everyday crap everyone else wastes their time on.

If you're one of the Humanitarians of Tinder, you're gonna want a prop, too — and what better one than a child from the developing world?



From the same kind of privilege and lack of self-awareness that brought us Selfies With Homeless People, meet the white people of Tinder who choose to advertise themselves as adventurous, worldly, and selfless by using people of color as window dressing. Nerve's Liam Mathews pretty much sums up how much in poor taste this is:

"... it's noble and admirable to try to help struggling people, but is the goal to help, or is it to get a cute photo opportunity that will one day hopefully get you laid?"





There's more than a few ethically questionable practices on display, which the Washington Post's Caitlin Dewey notes. First and worst is the actual act of turning a child from the developing world into a prop in your hookup profile. But also maddening are the inherent flaunting of privilege, the "cringe-inducing faux-martyrdom" on display, and the complete lack of awareness that it probably won't get the self-proclaimed humanitarians laid.




"I doubt they would grab those same pictures for a dating profile site. Obviously the original intent, is, 'Hey, friends, look where I was,'" creator Cody Clarke told Fast Company. "If you see a lot of them in a row, it becomes a trend, and becomes a disgusting thing. It's like they're standing around props."

"I'm mostly just archiving a phenomenon that's occurring." 

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Tom McKay

Tom is a staff writer at Mic, covering national politics, media, policing and the war on drugs. He is based in New York and can be reached at tmckay@mic.com.

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