Which Bands Hipsters Will Start To Like Next, In One Graph

Which Bands Hipsters Will Start To Like Next, In One Graph

Being a hipster is tough these days.

Hipsters are still the butt of mockery and derision all across the Internet. Even worse, a lot of their tastes have been completely appropriated by the mainstream. Artists that used to stand for all that was obscure and artful, such as Arcade Fire and The National, are now winning Grammys and having their albums sold in Starbucks. And everybody already knew about Starbucks and the Grammys.


Hipster music has to be high quality, while being just avant-garde and edgy enough to fit the hipster mantra: "I've been listening to a lot of [X] lately, you've probably never heard of them." The old mainstays just don't fit that definition anymore.

Thankfully the good people over at Priceonomics have developed a handy graphic to help hipsters through these trying times. Using the following comprehensive mathematical modeling tool, hipsters can immediately recognize which bands are worthy of interest while remaining obscure enough to complement the hipster's totally unique and abstruse identity. Take a look:

 

Image Credit: Priceonomics

The graph compares the scores a band's albums receive on Pitchfork (which, despite its growing popularity, remains the snarkiest, most "indie" blog around) against the number of Facebook shares those reviews get. This serves as a means of establishing which bands are great by a hipster's judgment while still not being that well-known for their greatness. Bands below the linear regression line (the blue dots) are still hip and safe for hipsters to identify with; bands above the line, though they may be brilliant, are simply too mainstream to be cool.

Here are some bands to check out if you're a hipster:


The methodology is sound, but some questionable entries still managed to slip in. For example: Drake.


How much do you trust the information in this article?

Tom Barnes

Tom Barnes is a senior staff writer at Mic focused on music, activism and the intersection between the two. He's based in New York and can be reached at tom@mic.com.

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